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Welcome to Planet Gentoo, an aggregation of Gentoo-related weblog articles written by Gentoo developers. For a broader range of topics, you might be interested in Gentoo Universe.

July 22, 2014
Diego E. Pettenò a.k.a. flameeyes (homepage, bugs)
LibreSSL: drop-in and ABI leakage (July 22, 2014, 23:09 UTC)

There has been some confusion on my previous post with Bob Beck of LibreSSL on whether I would advocate for using a LibreSSL shared object as a drop-in replacement for an OpenSSL shared object. Let me state this here, boldly: you should never, ever, for no reason, use shared objects from different major/minor OpenSSL versions or implementations (such as LibreSSL) as a drop-in replacement for one another.

The reason is, obviously, that the ABI of these libraries differs, sometimes subtly enought that they may actually load and run, but then perform abysmally insecure operations, as its data structures will have changed, and now instead of reading your random-generated key, you may be reading the master private key. nd in general, for other libraries you may even be calling the wrong set of functions, especially for those written in C++, where the vtable content may be rearranged across versions.

What I was discussing in the previous post was the fact that lots of proprietary software packages, by bundling a version of Curl that depends on the RAND_egd() function, will require either unbundling it, or keeping along a copy of OpenSSL to use for runtime linking. And I think that is a problem that people need to consider now rather than later for a very simple reason.

Even if LibreSSL (or any other reimplementation, for what matters) takes foot as the default implementation for all Linux (and not-Linux) distributions, you'll never be able to fully forget of OpenSSL: not only if you have proprietary software that you maintain, but also because a huge amount of software (and especially hardware) out there will not be able to update easily. And the fact that LibreSSL is throwing away so much of the OpenSSL clutter also means that it'll be more difficult to backport fixes — while at the same time I think that a good chunk of the black hattery will focus on OpenSSL, especially if it feels "abandoned", while most of the users will still be using it somehow.

But putting aside the problem of the direct drop-in incompatibilities, there is one more problem that people need to understand, especially Gentoo users, and most other systems that do not completely rebuild their package set when replacing a library like this. The problem is what I would call "ABI leakage".

Let's say you have a general libfoo that uses libssl; it uses a subset of the API that works with both OpenSSL. Now you have a bar program that uses libfoo. If the library is written properly, then it'll treat all the data structures coming from libssl as opaque, providing no way for bar to call into libssl without depending on the SSL API du jour (and thus putting a direct dependency on libssl for the executable). But it's very well possible that libfoo is not well-written and actually treats the libssl API as transparent. For instance a common mistake is to use one of the SSL data structures inline (rather than as a pointer) in one of its own public structures.

This situation would be barely fine, as long as the data types for libfoo are also completely opaque, as then it's only the code for libfoo that relies on the structures, and since you're rebuilding it anyway (as libssl is not ABI-compatible), you solve your problem. But if we keep assuming a worst-case scenario, then you have bar actually dealing with the data structures, for instance by allocating a sized buffer itself, rather than calling into a proper allocation function from libfoo. And there you have a problem.

Because now the ABI of libfoo is not directly defined by its own code, but also by whichever ABI libssl has! It's a similar problem as the symbol table used as an ABI proxy: while your software will load and run (for a while), you're really using a different ABI, as libfoo almost certainly does not change its soname when it's rebuilt against a newer version of libssl. And that can easily cause crashes and worse (see the note above about dropping in LibreSSL as a replacement for OpenSSL).

Now honestly none of this is specific to LibreSSL. The same is true if you were to try using OpenSSL 1.0 shared objects for software built against OpenSSL 0.9 — which is why I cringed any time I heard people suggesting to use symlink at the time, and it seems like people are giving the same suicidal suggestion now with OpenSSL, according to Bob.

So once again, don't expect binary-compatibility across different versions of OpenSSL, LibreSSL, or any other implementation of the same API, unless they explicitly aim for that (and LibreSSL definitely doesn't!)

July 20, 2014
Diego E. Pettenò a.k.a. flameeyes (homepage, bugs)
LibreSSL and the bundled libs hurdle (July 20, 2014, 09:55 UTC)

It was over five years ago that I ranted about the bundling of libraries and what that means for vulnerabilities found in those libraries. The world has, since, not really listened. RubyGems still keep insisting that "vendoring" gems is good, Go explicitly didn't implement a concept of shared libraries, and let's not even talk about Docker or OSv and their absolutism in static linking and bundling of the whole operating system, essentially.

It should have been obvious how this can be a problem when Heartbleed came out, bundled copies of OpenSSL would have needed separate updates from the system libraries. I guess lots of enterprise users of such software were saved only by the fact that most of the bundlers ended up using older versions of OpenSSL where heartbeat was not implemented at all.

Now that we're talking about replacing the OpenSSL libraries with those coming from a different project, we're going to be hit by both edges of the proprietary software sword: bundling and ABI compatibility, which will make things really interesting for everybody.

If you've seen my (short, incomplete) list of RAND_egd() users which I posted yesterday. While the tinderbox from which I took this is out of date and needs cleaning, it is a good starting point to figure out the trends, and as somebody already picked up, the bundling is actually strong.

Software that bundled Curl, or even Python, but then relied on the system copy of OpenSSL, will now be looking for RAND_egd() and thus fail. You could be unbundling these libraries, and then use a proper, patched copy of Curl from the system, where the usage of RAND_egd() has been removed, but then again, this is what I've been advocating forever or so. With caveats, in the case of Curl.

But now if the use of RAND_egd() is actually coming from the proprietary bits themselves, you're stuck and you can't use the new library: you either need to keep around an old copy of OpenSSL (which may be buggy and expose even more vulnerability) or you need a shim library that only provides ABI compatibility against the new LibreSSL-provided library — I'm still not sure why this particular trick is not employed more often, when the changes to a library are only at the interface level but still implements the same functionality.

Now the good news is that from the list that I produced, at least the egd functions never seemed to be popular among proprietary developers. This is expected as egd was vastly a way to implement the /dev/random semantics for non-Linux systems, while the proprietary software that we deal with, at least in the Linux world, can just accept the existence of the devices themselves. So the only problems have to do with unbundling (or replacing) Curl and possibly the Python SSL module. Doing so is not obvious though, as I see from the list that there are at least two copies of libcurl.so.3 which is the older ABI for Curl — although admittedly one is from the scratchbox SDKs which could just as easily be replaced with something less hacky.

Anyway, my current task is to clean up the tinderbox so that it's in a working state, after which I plan to do a full build of all the reverse dependencies on OpenSSL, it's very possible that there are more entries that should be in the list, since it was built with USE=gnutls globally to test for GnuTLS 3.0 when it came out.

July 19, 2014
Paweł Hajdan, Jr. a.k.a. phajdan.jr (homepage, bugs)

I was experimenting in my arm chroot, and after a gcc upgrade and emerge --depclean --ask that removed the old gcc I got the following error:

# ls -l
ls: error while loading shared libraries: libgcc_s.so.1: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory

Fortunately the newer working gcc was present, so the steps to make things work again were:

# LD_LIBRARY_PATH="${LD_LIBRARY_PATH}:/usr/lib/gcc/armv7a-hardfloat-linux-gnueabi/4.8.2/" gcc-config -l
 * gcc-config: Active gcc profile is invalid!

 [1] armv7a-hardfloat-linux-gnueabi-4.8.2

# LD_LIBRARY_PATH="${LD_LIBRARY_PATH}:/usr/lib/gcc/armv7a-hardfloat-linux-gnueabi/4.8.2/" gcc-config 1 
 * Switching native-compiler to armv7a-hardfloat-linux-gnueabi-4.8.2 ...

Actually my first thought was using busybox. The unexpected breakage during a routine gcc upgrade made me do some research in case I can't rely on /bin/busybox being present and working.

I highly recommend the following links for further reading:
http://lambdaops.com/rm-rf-remains
http://eusebeia.dyndns.org/bashcp
http://www.reddit.com/r/linux/comments/27is0x/rm_rf_remains/ci199bk

Read more »

Diego E. Pettenò a.k.a. flameeyes (homepage, bugs)

When I read about LibreSSL coming from the OpenBSD developers, my first impression was that it was a stunt. I did not change my impression of it drastically still. While I know at least one quite good OpenBSD developer, my impression of the whole set is still the same: we have different concepts of security, and their idea of "cruft" is completely out there for me. But this is a topic for some other time.

So seeing the amount of scrutiny from other who are, like me, skeptical of the OpenBSD people left on their own is a good news. It keeps them honest, as they say. But it also means that things that wouldn't be otherwise understood by people not used to Linux don't get shoved under the rug.

This is not idle musings: I still remember (but can't find now) an article in which Theo boasted not ever having used Linux. And yet kept insisting that his operating system was clearly superior. I was honestly afraid that the way the fork-not-a-fork project was going to be handled was the same, I'm positively happy to be proven wrong up to now.

I actually have been thrilled to see that finally there is movement to replace the straight access to /dev/random and /dev/urandom: Ted's patch to implement a getrandom() system call that can be made compatible with OpenBSD's own getentropy() in user space. And even more I'm happy to see that at least one of the OpenBSD/LibreSSL developers pitching in to help shape the interface.

Dropping out the egd support made me puzzled for a moment, but then I realized that there is no point in using egd to feed the randomness to the process, you just need to feed entropy to the kernel, and let the process get it normally. I have had, unfortunately, quite a bit of experience with entropy-generating daemons, and I wonder if this might be the right time to suggest getting a new multi-source daemon out.

So a I going to just blindly trust the OpenBSD people because "they have a good track record"? No. And to anybody that suggest that you can take over lines and lines of code from someone else's crypto-related project, remove a bunch of code that you think is useless, and have an immediate result, my request is to please stop working with software altogether.

Security Holes Copyright © Randall Munroe.

I'm not saying that they would do it on purpose, or that they wouldn't be trying to do the darndest to make LibreSSL a good replacement for OpenSSL. What I'm saying is that I don't like the way, and the motives, the project was started from. And I think that a reality check, like the one they already got, was due and a good news.

On my side, once the library gets a bit more mileage I'll be happy to run the tinderbox against it. For now, I'm re-gaining access to Excelsior after a bad kernel update, and I'll just go and search with elfgrep for which binaries do use the egd functionalities and need to be patched, I'll post it on Twitter/G+ once I have it. I know it's not much, but this is what I can do.

July 14, 2014
Richard Freeman a.k.a. rich0 (homepage, bugs)
Quick systemd-nspawn guide (July 14, 2014, 20:31 UTC)

I switched to using systemd-nspawn in place of chroot and wanted to give a quick guide to using it.  The short version is that I’d strongly recommend that anybody running systemd that uses chroot switch over – there really are no downsides as long as your kernel is properly configured.

Chroot should be no stranger to anybody who works on distros, and I suspect that the majority of Gentoo users have need for it from time to time.

The Challenges of chroot

For most interactive uses it isn’t sufficient to just run chroot.  Usually you need to mount /proc, /sys, and bind mount /dev so that you don’t have issues like missing ptys, etc.  If you use tmpfs you might also want to mount the new tmp, var/tmp as tmpfs.  Then you might want to make other bind mounts into the chroot.  None of this is particularly difficult, but you usually end up writing a small script to manage it.

Now, I routinely do full backups, and usually that involves excluding stuff like tmp dirs, and anything resembling a bind mount.  When I set up a new chroot that means updating my backup config, which I usually forget to do since most of the time the chroot mounts aren’t running anyway.  Then when I do leave it mounted overnight I end up with backups consuming lots of extra space (bind mounts of large trees).

Finally, systemd now by default handles bind mounts a little differently when they contain other mount points (such as when using –rbind).  Apparently unmounting something in the bind mount will cause systemd to unmount the corresponding directory on the other side of the bind.  Imagine my surprise when I unmounted my chroot bind to /dev and discovered /dev/pts and /dev/shm no longer mounted on the host.  It looks like there are ways to change that, but this isn’t the point of my post (it just spurred me to find another way).

Systemd-nspawn’s Advantages

Systemd-nspawn is a tool that launches a container, and it can operate just like chroot in its simplest form.  By default it automatically sets up most of the overhead like /dev, /tmp, etc.  With a few options it can also set up other bind mounts as well.  When the container exits all the mounts are cleaned up.

From the outside of the container nothing appears different when the container is running.  In fact, you could spawn 5 different systemd-nspawn container instances from the same chroot and they wouldn’t have any interaction except via the filesystem (and that excludes /dev, /tmp, and so on – only changes in /usr, /etc will propagate across).  Your backup won’t see the bind mounts, or tmpfs, or anything else mounted within the container.

The container also has all those other nifty container benefits like containment – a killall inside the container won’t touch anything outside, and so on.  The security isn’t airtight – the intent is to prevent accidental mistakes.  

Then, if you use a compatible sysvinit (which includes systemd, and I think recent versions of openrc), you can actually boot the container, which drops you to a getty inside.  That means you can use fstab to do additional mounts inside the container, run daemons, and so on.  You get almost all the benefits of virtualization for the cost of a chroot (no need to build a kernel, and so on).  It is a bit odd to be running systemctl poweroff inside what looks just like a chroot, but it works.

Note that unless you do a bit more setup you will share the same network interface with the host, so no running sshd on the container if you have it on the host, etc.  I won’t get into this but it shouldn’t be hard to run a separate network namespace and bind the interfaces so that the new instance can run dhcp.

How to do it

So, getting it actually working will likely be the shortest bit in this post.

You need support for namespaces and multiple devpts instances in your kernel:

CONFIG_UTS_NS=y
CONFIG_IPC_NS=y
CONFIG_USER_NS=y
CONFIG_PID_NS=y
CONFIG_NET_NS=y
CONFIG_DEVPTS_MULTIPLE_INSTANCES=y

 From there launching a namespace just like a chroot is really simple:

systemd-nspawn -D .

That’s it – you can exit from it just like a chroot.  From inside you can run mount and see that it has taken care of /dev and /tmp for you.  The “.” is the path to the chroot, which I assume is the current directory.  With nothing further it runs bash inside.

If you want to add some bind mounts it is easy:

systemd-nspawn -D . –bind /usr/portage

Now your /usr/portage is bound to your host, so no need to sync/etc.  If you want to bind to a different destination add a “:dest” after the source, relative to the root of the chroot (so –bind foo is the same as –bind foo:foo).

If the container has a functional init that can handle being run inside, you can add a -b to boot it:

systemd-nspawn -D . –bind /usr/portage -b

Watch the init do its job.  Shut down the container to exit.

Now, if that container is running systemd you can direct its journal to the host journal with -h:

systemd-nspawn -D . –bind /usr/portage -j -b

Now, nspawn registers the container so that it shows up in machinectl.  That makes it easy to launch a new getty on it, or ssh to it (if it is running ssh – see my note above about network namespaces), or power it off from the host.  

That’s it.  If you’re running systemd I’d suggest ditching chroot almost entirely in favor of nspawn.  


Filed under: foss, gentoo, linux

Patrick Lauer a.k.a. bonsaikitten (homepage, bugs)
Biggest ebuilds in-tree (July 14, 2014, 06:39 UTC)

Random datapoint: There's only about 10 packages with ebuilds over 600 lines.

Sorted by lines, duplicate entries per-package removed, these are the biggest ones:

828 dev-lang/ghc/ghc-7.6.3-r1.ebuild
817 dev-lang/php/php-5.3.28-r3.ebuild
750 net-nds/openldap/openldap-2.4.38-r2.ebuild
664 www-client/chromium/chromium-36.0.1985.67.ebuild
654 www-servers/nginx/nginx-1.4.7.ebuild
658 games-rpg/nwn-data/nwn-data-1.29-r5.ebuild
654 media-video/mplayer/mplayer-1.1.1-r1.ebuild
644 dev-vcs/git/git-9999-r3.ebuild
621 x11-drivers/ati-drivers/ati-drivers-13.4.ebuild
617 sys-freebsd/freebsd-lib/freebsd-lib-9.1-r11.ebuild

July 12, 2014
Hanno Böck a.k.a. hanno (homepage, bugs)
LibreSSL on Gentoo (July 12, 2014, 18:31 UTC)

LibreSSL PuffyYesterday the LibreSSL project released the first portable version that works on Linux. LibreSSL is a fork of OpenSSL and was created by the OpenBSD team in the aftermath of the Heartbleed bug.

Yesterday and today I played around with it on Gentoo Linux. I was able to replace my system's OpenSSL completely with LibreSSL and with few exceptions was able to successfully rebuild all packages using OpenSSL.

After getting this running on my own system I installed it on a test server. The Webpage tlsfun.de runs on that server. The functionality changes are limited, the only thing visible from the outside is the support for the experimental, not yet standardized ChaCha20-Poly1305 cipher suites, which is a nice thing.

A warning ahead: This is experimental, in no way stable or supported and if you try any of this you do it at your own risk. Please report any bugs you have with my overlay to me or leave a comment and don't disturb anyone else (from Gentoo or LibreSSL) with it. If you want to try it, you can get a portage overlay in a subversion repository. You can check it out with this command:
svn co https://svn.hboeck.de/libressl-overlay/
git clone https://github.com/gentoo/libressl.git

This is what I had to do to get things running:

LibreSSL itself

First of all the Gentoo tree contains a lot of packages that directly depend on openssl, so I couldn't just replace that. The correct solution to handle such issues would be to create a virtual package and change all packages depending directly on openssl to depend on the virtual. This is already discussed in the appropriate Gentoo bug, but this would mean patching hundreds of packages so I skipped it and worked around it by leaving a fake openssl package in place that itself depends on libressl.

LibreSSL deprecates some APIs from OpenSSL. The first thing that stopped me was that various programs use the functions RAND_egd() and RAND_egd_bytes(). I didn't know until yesterday what egd is. It stands for Entropy Gathering Daemon and is a tool written in perl meant to replace the functionality of /dev/(u)random on non-Linux-systems. The LibreSSL-developers consider it insecure and after having read what it is I have to agree. However, the removal of those functions causes many packages not to build, upon them wget, python and ruby. My workaround was to add two dummy functions that just return -1, which is the error code if the Entropy Gathering Daemon is not available. So the API still behaves like expected. I also posted the patch upstream, but the LibreSSL devs don't like it. So on the long term it's probably better to fix applications to stop trying to use egd, but for now these dummy functions make it easier for me to build my system.

The second issue popping up was that the libcrypto.so from libressl contains an undefined main() function symbol which causes linking problems with a couple of applications (subversion, xorg-server, hexchat). According to upstream this undefined symbol is intended and most likely these are bugs in the applications having linking problems. However, for now it was easier for me to patch the symbol out instead of fixing all the apps. Like the egd issue on the long term fixing the applications is better.

The third issue was that LibreSSL doesn't ship pkg-config (.pc) files, some apps use them to get the correct compilation flags. I grabbed the ones from openssl and adjusted them accordingly.

OpenSSH

This was the most interesting issue from all of them.

To understand this you have to understand how both LibreSSL and OpenSSH are developed. They are both from OpenBSD and they use some functions that are only available there. To allow them to be built on other systems they release portable versions which ship the missing OpenBSD-only-functions. One of them is arc4random().

Both LibreSSL and OpenSSH ship their compatibility version of arc4random(). The one from OpenSSH calls RAND_bytes(), which is a function from OpenSSL. The RAND_bytes() function from LibreSSL however calls arc4random(). Due to the linking order OpenSSH uses its own arc4random(). So what we have here is a nice recursion. arc4random() and RAND_bytes() try to call each other. The result is a segfault.

I fixed it by using the LibreSSL arc4random.c file for OpenSSH. I had to copy another function called arc4random_stir() from OpenSSH's arc4random.c and the header file thread_private.h. Surprisingly, this seems to work flawlessly.

Net-SSLeay

This package contains the perl bindings for openssl. The problem is a check for the openssl version string that expected the name OpenSSL and a version number with three numbers and a letter (like 1.0.1h). LibreSSL prints the version 2.0. I just hardcoded the OpenSSL version numer, which is not a real fix, but it works for now.

SpamAssassin

SpamAssassin's code for spamc requires SSLv2 functions to be available. SSLv2 is heavily insecure and should not be used at all and therefore the LibreSSL devs have removed all SSLv2 function calls. Luckily, Debian had a patch to remove SSLv2 that I could use.

libesmtp / gwenhywfar

Some DES-related functions (DES is the old Data Encryption Standard) in OpenSSL are available in two forms: With uppercase DES_ and with lowercase des_. I can only guess that the des_ variants are for backwards compatibliity with some very old versions of OpenSSL. According to the docs the DES_ variants should be used. LibreSSL has removed the des_ variants.

For gwenhywfar I wrote a small patch and sent it upstream. For libesmtp all the code was in ntlm. After reading that ntlm is an ancient, proprietary Microsoft authentication protocol I decided that I don't need that anyway so I just added --disable-ntlm to the ebuild.

Dovecot

In Dovecot two issues popped up. LibreSSL removed the SSL Compression functionality (which is good, because since the CRIME attack we know it's not secure). Dovecot's configure script checks for it, but the check doesn't work. It checks for a function that LibreSSL keeps as a stub. For now I just disabled the check in the configure script. The solution is probably to remove all remaining stub functions. The configure script could probably also be changed to work in any case.

The second issue was that the Dovecot code has some #ifdef clauses that check the openssl version number for the ECDH auto functionality that has been added in OpenSSL 1.0.2 beta versions. As the LibreSSL version number 2.0 is higher than 1.0.2 it thinks it is newer and tries to enable it, but the code is not present in LibreSSL. I changed the #ifdefs to check for the actual functionality by checking a constant defined by the ECDH auto code.

Apache httpd

The Apache http compilation complained about a missing ENGINE_CTRL_CHIL_SET_FORKCHECK. I have no idea what it does, but I found a patch to fix the issue, so I didn't investigate it further.

Further reading:
Someone else tried to get things running on Sabotage Linux.

Update: I've abandoned my own libressl overlay, a LibreSSL overlay by various Gentoo developers is now maintained at GitHub.

July 09, 2014
Sven Vermeulen a.k.a. swift (homepage, bugs)

SELinux users might be facing failures when emerge is merging a package to the file system, with an error that looks like so:

>>> Setting SELinux security labels
/usr/lib64/portage/bin/misc-functions.sh: line 1112: 23719 Segmentation fault      /usr/sbin/setfiles "${file_contexts_path}" -r "${D}" "${D}"
 * ERROR: dev-libs/libpcre-8.35::gentoo failed:
 *   Failed to set SELinux security labels.

This has been reported as bug 516608 and, after some investigation, the cause is found. First the quick workaround:

~# cd /etc/selinux/strict/contexts/files
~# rm *.bin

And do the same for the other SELinux policy stores on the system (targeted, mcs, mls, …).

Now, what is happening… Inside the mentioned directory, binary files exist such as file_contexts.bin. These files contain the compiled regular expressions of the non-binary files (like file_contexts). By using the precompiled versions, regular expression matching by the SELinux utilities is a lot faster. Not that it is massively slow otherwise, but it is a nice speed improvement nonetheless.

However, when pcre updates occur, then the basic structures that pcre uses internally might change. For instance, a number might switch from a signed integer to an unsigned integer. As pcre is meant to be used within the same application run, most applications do not have any issues with such changes. However, the SELinux utilities effectively serialize these structures and later read them back in. If the new pcre uses a changed structure, then the read-in structures are incompatible and even corrupt.

Hence the segmentation faults.

To resolve this, Stephen Smalley created a patch that includes PCRE version checking. This patch is now included in sys-libs/libselinux version 2.3-r1. The package also recompiles the existing *.bin files so that the older binary files are no longer on the system. But there is a significant chance that this update will not trickle down to the users in time, so the workaround might be needed.

I considered updating the pcre ebuilds as well with this workaround, but considering that libselinux is most likely to be stabilized faster than any libpcre bump I let it go.

At least we have a solution for future upgrades; sorry for the noise.

Edit: libselinux-2.2.2-r5 also has the fix included.

Michał Górny a.k.a. mgorny (homepage, bugs)
The Council and the Community (July 09, 2014, 06:27 UTC)

A new Council election is in progress and we have a few candidates. Most of them have written a manifesto. For some of them this is one of the few mails they sent to the public mailing lists recently. For one of them this is the only one. Do we want to elect people who do not participate actively in the Community? Does such election even make sense?

Gentoo is an open, free community. While the Developer Community is not really open (joining consumes a lot of time), the discussion media were always open to non-developer comments and ideas. Most of the people working on Gentoo are volunteers, doing all the work in their free time or between other tasks.

While we have formal rules, leaders and projects, all of them have very limited power. The rules pretty much boil down to being «do not»s. You can try to convince developer to follow your vision but you can’t force him to. If you try too hard, the best you can get is losing a valuable contributor. And I’m not talking about the extremes like rage quits; the person will simply no longer be interested in working on a particular project.

Most of the mailing list (and bug) discussions are about that. Finding possible solutions, discussing their technical merits and finding an agreement. It is not enough to choose a solution which is considered best by a majority or a team. It is about agreeing on a solution that is good and that comes with people willing to work on it. Otherwise, you end up with no solution because what has been chosen is not being implemented.

Consider the late games team policy thread. The games team and their supporter believes their solutions to have technical merit. Without getting into debating this, we can easily see the effects. The team is barely getting any contributions, mostly thanks to a few (three?) persistent out-of-team developers that are willing to overcome all the difficulties. And even those contributors support the idea of abolishing the current policy.

So, what’s the purpose of all the teams, their leads and the Council in all this? As I see it, teams are the people who know the particular area better than others, and have valuable experience. Yet teams need to be open to the Community, to listen to their feedback, to provide valuable points to the discussion and to guide it towards a consensus.

The teams may need to make a final decision if a mailing list discussion doesn’t end in a clear agreement. However, they need to weigh it carefully, to foresee the outcome. It is not enough to discuss the merits in a semi-open meeting, and it is not enough to consider only the technical aspect. The teams need to predict how the decision will affect the Community, how it will affect the users and the contributors.

The Council is not very different from those teams, albeit more formal in its proceedings. Likewise, it needs to listen to the Community, especially if it is called specifically to revise a team’s decision (or lack of action).

Now, how could the Council determine what’s best for Gentoo without actively participating in the proceedings of the Community? Non-active candidates, do you expect to start participating after being elected? Or do you think that grepping through the threads five minutes before the meeting is enough?

Well, I hope that the next Council will be up to the task. That it will listen to the Community and weigh their decisions carefully. That it will breed action and support ideas backed by technical merits and willing people, rather than decisions that discourage further contribution.

July 06, 2014
Sebastian Pipping a.k.a. sping (homepage, bugs)

Hello :)

I don’t get to playing with code much lately. Yesterday and today I put some effort into trying to understand and document the EGF file format used by Xie Xie to store Xiangqi games including per-move comments and a bit of other metadata.

Status quo includes a simple command line tool:

# ./egf/cli.py test.egf 
Event:  Blog post
Site:  At home
Date:  6-7-2014
Round:  1
Red name:  sping
Black name:  Xie Xie Freeware 2.5.0
Description:  Command line tool demo input
Author:  sping

File i:  R _ _ P _ _ p _ _ r
File h:  H _ C _ _ _ _ c _ h
File g:  E _ _ P _ _ p _ _ e
File f:  A _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ a
File e:  K _ _ P _ _ p _ _ k
File d:  A _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ a
File c:  E _ _ P _ _ p _ _ e
File b:  H _ C _ _ _ _ c _ h
File a:  R _ _ P _ _ p _ _ r
(Ranks 9 to 0 from left to right)

To start:  red

6 single moves in total
[ 1]  c h3  - e3 
[ 1]                   H h10 - g8 
[ 2]  h h1  - g3 
[ 2]                   R i10 - h10
[ 3]  r i1  - h1 
[ 3]                   C h8  - h4 

Result:  to be determined

Bytes remaining to be read:
0 0

I welcome help to fill in the remaining blanks, e.g. with decoding time markers and king-in-check markers of moves.

If you are on Gentoo and would like to run Xie Xie the easy way, grab games-board/xiexie-freeware-bin from the betagarden overlay.

EGF files for inspection can be downloaded from http://www.cc-xiexie.com/download.php.

Gentoo Monthly Newsletter: June 2014 (July 06, 2014, 15:00 UTC)

Gentoo News

Interview with Patrick McLean (chutzpah)

(by David Abbott)
1. Hi Patrick o/ tell us about yourself?
I am currently a Gentoo Engineer (yes, that is my actual job title) at Gaikai. Before this job I was a Systems Administrator at the McGill Centre for Intelligent Machines, in Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
When I am not coding or packaging I like to watch television, read sci-fi and fantasy, cycle, occasionally go on hikes. When I can I love downhill skiing, but it’s a little harder in California than it was in Quebec.

2. How did you get involved with Linux and Open Source, and what was the path that lead to you to Gentoo?
I started using Linux at the end of 1996. Originally I switched to Linux because with the slow Internet connections of the times, web pages would take a long time to load. I would often open dozens of windows so I could be reading on site while others were loading. After a certain number of open browsers, Windows 95 would start to bog down then just crash, while when I did the same thing on Linux it would just happily chug along.
Around 2001, when Gnome 2 came out, I wanted to try out, and I don’t like installing software outside of the package manager, so I attempted to get the rpms from the rawhide repository. This experience made me decide to look for a different distro, and I ended up liking Gentoo the most.

3. What aspects of Gentoo do you feel the developers and maintainers have got right?
The ebuild is a great source-based package format, it has it’s drawbacks but it is far superior to the other formats I have looked at. I also like that Gentoo treats configurability as an important feature. The frequent use of /etc/foo.d and the scriptability of many parts of the system is great.
I also like some of the more recent work that has gone in to not breaking systems, preserved-rebuild and (despite some overuse) subslots fix many of the annoyances we had in the old days.
I am also a big fan of what is now OpenRC, ever since I first started using Gentoo, I have thought that this is a huge improvement over the alternatives.

4. What is it about Gentoo you would like to see improved?
I think that portage itself is getting very crufty, and the code base is not very nice to work with. I am sure just about everyone reading this would agree that dependency resolution is way too slow at the moment (especially with subslots). Sometimes it generates error messages that are horribly verbose with no indication of how to fix them. I have seen those errors make people leave Gentoo, this is especially bad when the things it’s generating errors about are relatively harmless.
There are also other problems with how portage stores the information about installed packages on the disk, and binary packages in their current form just suck, and are pretty useless.

5. What resources have you found most helpful when troubleshooting within Gentoo and Linux in general?
For doing research into problems, google of course is very useful. For tracking down problems strace is probably the one tool I find the most useful. Of course also digging into the source is probably the single best way to figure out what is actually going on.

6. What are some of the projects within Gentoo that you enjoy contributing to?
I mostly do ebuild work at the moment, python is one area that I contribute the most to. I would like to get more in to package manager work, and I want to start helping more with OpenRC, but finding time is frequently a problem.

7. What is your programming background?
I taught myself to program on GW-BASIC for DOS, it was in no way a modern or even remotely modern language. I moved on to QBASIC a bit later on. Once I got to post high school I started learning Java, C, C++, but my first programming job was Visual Basic, it was an internship that turned in to a summer job. During this time frame I also taught myself shell scripting.
Later (around 2008) I taught myself python when a friend and I were trying to start a business.

8. For someone new to Python what tips could you give them to get a good foundation?
There are lots of good tutorials out there, I personally used Dive in to Python and found it quite useful. I also found that when I learned more about how Python is implemented, it improved my abilities quite a bit. If you truly understand that in Python everything is a dictionary, and the implications of that then it helps quite a bit in debugging the root cause of problems and write better code.

9. Tell us about pkgcore, its features and future?
Pkgcore is an alternative implementation of the PMS. It’s basically an alternative to portage. It has always had the eventual goal of becoming the default package manager on Gentoo, replacing portage. It’s currently orders of magnitude faster than portage. It’s code base is much cleaner, though a little hard to understand at first thanks to it’s use of libsnakeoil for performance optimization. Currently Tim Harder (radhermit) is working on getting all the recent portage feature implemented, it mostly supports EAPI 5 in the git repo now.
Hopefully it can attract more developers and eventually become a truly viable portage replacement, so we can get rid of the cruft that has built up in the portage source over the years.

10. Which open source programs would you like to see developed?
That’s a hard question to answer. I think the biggest one is I would love to see an open source firmware for BMC controllers. These are the extra small computers included in servers that allow things such as remote console and the ability to remotely manage servers. Currently the ecosystem is full of half-assed implementations done by hardware companies, many of which are rife with security holes. There is no standard for remote console, so they all use buggy and horrible java applets to implement this. I would love to see a standard open source suite that motherboard developer all use, with native remote console clients for major OSes.

11. What would be your dream job?
Well I have long wanted a job as a kernel developer, but have never had the time to really dedicate to get to the point where someone would hire me. My current job is a close second. I work with Gentoo every day at work, often writing new ebuilds an fixing bugs in existing ebuilds as part of my day-to-day duties at work.
My day-to-day duties involve ebuild development and debugging. I also do a lot of automation of things like installing new systems, and was the lead developer on our in-house answer to configuration management. I get to do a lot of cool stuff with Gentoo and I get to get paid for it.

12. Need any help?
Yes, we are currently hiring lots of positions, all working with Gentoo. We are really looking for ebuild developers of all kinds, especially if you are comfortable with Java ebuilds (not mandatory, but it would be nice). We are also looking for anyone who is familiar with Gentoo to help with work in Release Engineering and Site Reliability Engineering. We currently have offices in Southern California, USA and Berlin, Germany.
If you are interested in getting paid to work with Gentoo, please drop me a line.

13. With your skills you would be welcome in any project, why did you chose Gentoo?
It had been my distro of choice for many years, and I just ended maintaining a local overlay with many bug fixes and miscellaneous things, so I decided to become a developer to share my work with everyone else.

14. What can we do to get more people involved as Gentoo developers?
That’s a hard question to answer, at the moment probably the best way would be to get back the “hot” and “cool” factors. These days Gentoo is sort of a “background” distro that has been around for ages, has loads of users but new people don’t get excited about anymore, kind of like Debian.
I think we also need to reduce developer burnout, I get the impression that once some people become developers, they feel that they have to fix every bug in the tree. This leads to them being really productive devs for a few months, then leaving when they get burned out and quit.

15. What users would you like to see recruited to become Gentoo developers?
It would be nice to recruit some of the proxy maintainers to contribute to more packages. I don’t have anyone specific in mind at this moment.

16. As a Gentoo developer what are some of your accomplishments?
When I first started, I was on the amd64 bandwagon very early, so I ended up doing the 64-bit ports for a pretty large number of packges. More recently I maintain ebuilds for some particularly tricky packages such as Ganeti, which is a mixture of Python and Haskell code.

17. Same question but work related.
Well, it’s probably a combination of two things.
Creating Gentoo profiles to auto generate dozens of different server image types, and building solid base Gentoo install for those servers.
Also building a fully automated Gentoo installation system that can partition disks, set up RAID, LVM and other parameters based on a JSON definition. Also a configuration file generation system that makes up the basis of our configuration management system.

18. What are the specs of your personal and work boxes?
My home box is a 6-core Core-i7 970 with 24GB of RAM, a GeForce 770, a 256GB SSD, 2 500GB spinning disks and a 1TB spinning disk. I have a 24” monitor and a 22”.
My workstation at work is a 8-core Opteron with 16GB of RAM. I have 2 32” monitors hooked up to it. We also have some pretty beefy servers for building Gentoo images.

19. Describe your home network.
Nothing that exciting, I have a Netgear WNDR3800 running OpenWRT, and a gigabit switch. Connected to that I have a Synology NAS, a smart TV that I never use the smart features of, a media streaming box, a Blu-Ray, a PS4 (I work for Sony) and a couple of computers.

20. What de/wm do you use now and what did you use in the past?
I currently use XFCE, I used to use Gnome 2, tried out Gnome 3 for 2 days, decided that it isn’t for me so created a huge package.mask to mask it. I stuck with that for several months, then decided I should switch to something else. I tried out Cinnamon for a bit, played with E17, considered Mate but then settled on XFCE.

21. What gives you the most enjoyment within the Gentoo community?
In general developers get along pretty well, this is more true on IRC than on the mailing lists. Also, at conferences there is a strong feeling of community among the Gentoo developers who are attending the conference.

22. How did you get the nick (chutzpah)?
It’s kind of a silly story. Way back when I first started hanging out online (early 90s) I needed a nick. I ended up choosing the name of a particularly challenging Ski Trail at the Sunday River ski resort in Maine. I have been using the name ever since.

Council News

This month’s big issue was to compile a preliminary list of features that could go into the next EAPI. It probably does not make sense to go into all the technical details here; you can find the accepted items in the meeting summaries [1,2,3] or on a separate wiki page [4]. One user-visible change will be that from EAPI=6 on every ebuild should accept user patches from /etc/portage/patches [5], as many do already today. Another one will be that(given an implementation in Portage is ready in time) a new type of use-flags will be introduced that can be used to, e.g., only pull in run-time dependencies; toggling such a useflag does not require a rebuild of the package.

In addition, some of us prepared a proposal to make it in the end easier for developers to host semi-official services within the gentoo.org domain [6]. This still needs work and is definitely not something the council can do on its own, but the general idea was given clear support.

Election News

The nomination process is complete, and voting is now open. This year’s candidates are blueness, dberkholz, dilfridge, jlec, patrick, pinkbyte, radhermit, rich0, ryao,TomWij, ulm, williamh, and zerochaos. Additionally, almost every developer was nominated for the council. Elections will be open until 2359 UTC on July 14, and results should be posted around July 16. We’ve already had around 30 people vote, but there are 200 more developers who can vote. Get out there and vote!

Featured New Project: Hardened Musl

(by Anthony G. Basile)

The hardened musl project aims to build and maintain full stage3 tarballs for amd64, arm, mips and i686 architectures using musl as a its C standard library rather than glibc. The “hardened” aspect means that we will also make use of toolchain hardening features so that the resulting userland executables and libraries are more resistant to exploit, although we also provide a “vanilla” flavor without any hardening. In every respect, these stages will be like regular Gentoo stages, except glibc will be replaced by musl.

musl, like uClibc, is ideal for embedded systems although both can be used for servers and desktops. Embedded systems generally have three needs beyond regular systems: 1) They need to have a small footprint both on their storage device and in RAM. 2) They need speed for real time applications. 3) And in some situations, they need their executables to be statically linked. A typical embedded system has has a minimally configured busybox for some needed utilities as well as whatever service the image is to provide, eg. some httpd service. The stages we are producing are not really embedded stages because they don’t use busybox to provide some minimal set of utilities; rather, they use the full set of utilities provided by coreutils, util-linux and friends. This makes these stages ideal as development platforms for building custom embedded images [1] or expanded into a server or desktop system.

However, be warned! If you try to build a full desktop system, you will hit breakage since musl adheres closely to standards while many packages do not. We are working on getting patches [2] for as a full XFCE4 desktop as we did for uClibc [3]. On the other hand, I’ve had lots of success building servers and routers from those stages without any extra patching.

[1] An example of the hardened uClibc stages being used this way is “Real Time And Tiny” (aka RAT) Gentoo.
[2] These patches are house on the musl branch of the hardened dev overlay.
[3] As a subproject of the Hardened uClibc project, maintain a full XFCE4 desktop based on uClibc, affectionately named “Lilblue” after the Little Blue Penguin, a smaller relative of the Gentoo.

Gentoo Developer Moves

Summary

Gentoo is made up of 237 active developers, of which 35 are currently away.
Gentoo has recruited a total of 799 developers since its inception.

Changes

The following developers have recently changed roles:
None this month

Additions

The following developers have recently joined the project:

Moves

The following developers recently left the Gentoo project:
None this month

Portage

This section summarizes the current state of the portage tree.

Architectures 45
Categories 162
Packages 17529
Ebuilds 37513
Architecture Stable Testing Total % of Packages
alpha 3604 551 4155 23.70%
amd64 10781 6247 17028 97.14%
amd64-fbsd 0 1578 1578 9.00%
arm 2662 1726 4388 25.03%
hppa 3059 482 3541 20.20%
ia64 3181 620 3801 21.68%
m68k 623 82 705 4.02%
mips 4 2386 2390 13.63%
ppc 6819 2375 9194 52.45%
ppc64 4317 875 5192 29.62%
s390 1486 316 1802 10.28%
sh 1681 387 2068 11.80%
sparc 4122 896 5018 28.63%
sparc-fbsd 0 316 316 1.80%
x86 11444 5308 16752 95.57%
x86-fbsd 0 3236 3236 18.46%

gmn-portage-stats-2013-11

Security

The following GLSAs have been released by the Security Team

GLSA Package Description Bug
201406-36 net-nds/openldap OpenLDAP: Multiple vulnerabilities 290345
201406-35 net-im/openfire Openfire: Multiple vulnerabilities 266129
201406-34 kde-base/kdelibs KDE Libraries: Multiple vulnerabilities 358025
201406-33 net-analyzer/wireshark Wireshark: Multiple vulnerabilities 503792
201406-32 dev-java/icedtea-bin IcedTea JDK: Multiple vulnerabilities 312297
201406-31 kde-base/konqueror Konqueror: Multiple vulnerabilities 438452
201406-30 app-admin/sudo sudo: Privilege escalation 503586
201406-29 net-misc/spice-gtk spice-gtk: Privilege escalation 435694
201406-28 media-video/libav Libav: Multiple vulnerabilities 439052
201406-27 None polkit Spice-Gtk systemd HPLIP libvirt: Privilege escalation 484486
201406-26 dev-python/django Django: Multiple vulnerabilities 508514
201406-25 net-misc/asterisk Asterisk: Multiple vulnerabilities 513102
201406-24 net-dns/dnsmasq Dnsmasq: Denial of Service 436894
201406-23 app-admin/denyhosts DenyHosts: Denial of Service 495130
201406-22 media-libs/nas Network Audio System: Multiple vulnerabilities 484480
201406-21 net-misc/curl cURL: Multiple vulnerabilities 505864
201406-20 www-servers/nginx nginx: Arbitrary code execution 505018
201406-19 dev-libs/nss Mozilla Network Security Service: Multiple vulnerabilities 455558
201406-18 x11-terms/rxvt-unicode rxvt-unicode: User-assisted execution of arbitrary code 509174
201406-17 www-plugins/adobe-flash Adobe Flash Player: Multiple vulnerabilities 512888
201406-16 net-print/cups-filters cups-filters: Multiple vulnerabilities 504474
201406-15 kde-misc/kdirstat KDirStat: Arbitrary command execution 504994
201406-14 www-client/opera Opera: Multiple vulnerabilities 442044
201406-13 net-misc/memcached memcached: Multiple vulnerabilities 279386
201406-12 net-dialup/freeradius FreeRADIUS: Arbitrary code execution 501754
201406-11 x11-libs/libXfont libXfont: Multiple vulnerabilities 510250
201406-10 www-servers/lighttpd lighttpd: Multiple vulnerabilities 392581
201406-09 net-libs/gnutls GnuTLS: Multiple vulnerabilities 501282
201406-08 www-plugins/adobe-flash Adobe Flash Player: Multiple vulnerabilities 510278
201406-07 net-analyzer/echoping Echoping: Buffer Overflow Vulnerabilities 349569
201406-06 media-sound/mumble Mumble: Multiple vulnerabilities 500486
201406-05 mail-client/mutt Mutt: Arbitrary code execution 504462
201406-04 dev-util/systemtap SystemTap: Denial of Service 405345
201406-03 net-analyzer/fail2ban Fail2ban: Multiple vulnerabilities 364883
201406-02 app-arch/libarchive libarchive: Multiple vulnerabilities 366687
201406-01 None D-Bus GLib: Privilege escalation 436028

Package Removals/Additions

Removals

Package Developer Date
dev-python/python-gnutls mrueg 02 Jun 2014
dev-ruby/fastthread mrueg 07 Jun 2014
dev-perl/perl-PBS zlogene 11 Jun 2014
games-strategy/openxcom mr_bones_ 14 Jun 2014
media-plugins/vdr-noepgmenu hd_brummy 15 Jun 2014
net-mail/fetchyahoo eras 16 Jun 2014
app-emacs/redo ulm 17 Jun 2014
games-emulation/boycott-advance-sdl ulm 17 Jun 2014
games-emulation/neopocott ulm 17 Jun 2014

Additions

Package Developer Date
dev-ruby/sshkit graaff 01 Jun 2014
media-gfx/plantuml pva 02 Jun 2014
dev-python/sphinxcontrib-plantuml pva 02 Jun 2014
dev-util/kdevelop-qmake zx2c4 02 Jun 2014
x11-misc/easystroke jer 04 Jun 2014
dev-python/docopt jlec 04 Jun 2014
dev-python/funcsigs jlec 04 Jun 2014
virtual/funcsigs jlec 04 Jun 2014
dev-python/common jlec 04 Jun 2014
dev-python/tabulate jlec 04 Jun 2014
app-admin/ngxtop jlec 04 Jun 2014
dev-python/natsort idella4 05 Jun 2014
dev-libs/liblinear jer 05 Jun 2014
net-analyzer/arp-scan jer 06 Jun 2014
www-servers/mongoose zmedico 06 Jun 2014
dev-ruby/spring graaff 06 Jun 2014
dev-ruby/wikicloth mrueg 06 Jun 2014
net-analyzer/ipgen jer 07 Jun 2014
sec-policy/selinux-dropbox swift 07 Jun 2014
dev-python/jingo idella4 08 Jun 2014
dev-python/click rafaelmartins 08 Jun 2014
dev-python/Coffin idella4 08 Jun 2014
dev-python/sphinx_rtd_theme bicatali 09 Jun 2014
dev-ruby/netrc graaff 09 Jun 2014
dev-ruby/delayer naota 11 Jun 2014
www-client/qtweb jer 11 Jun 2014
dev-python/pyoembed rafaelmartins 12 Jun 2014
www-apps/blohg-tumblelog rafaelmartins 12 Jun 2014
dev-python/jaraco-utils patrick 12 Jun 2014
dev-python/more-itertools patrick 12 Jun 2014
dev-libs/libserialport vapier 12 Jun 2014
dev-python/pretty-yaml chutzpah 12 Jun 2014
net-libs/phodav dev-zero 13 Jun 2014
dev-python/django-haystack idella4 14 Jun 2014
sci-libs/libsigrok vapier 14 Jun 2014
sci-libs/libsigrokdecode vapier 14 Jun 2014
sci-electronics/sigrok-cli vapier 14 Jun 2014
sys-firmware/sigrok-firmware-fx2lafw vapier 14 Jun 2014
sci-electronics/pulseview vapier 14 Jun 2014
dev-ruby/hashr mrueg 14 Jun 2014
games-strategy/openxcom maksbotan 14 Jun 2014
games-engines/openxcom mr_bones_ 14 Jun 2014
net-analyzer/icinga2 prometheanfire 15 Jun 2014
dev-python/pyxenstore robbat2 15 Jun 2014
sys-cluster/ampi jauhien 16 Jun 2014
dev-python/pyjwt idella4 17 Jun 2014
app-emulation/openstack-guest-agents-unix robbat2 22 Jun 2014
dev-python/plyr idella4 22 Jun 2014
app-misc/relevation radhermit 22 Jun 2014
media-sound/lyvi idella4 22 Jun 2014
app-emulation/xe-guest-utilities robbat2 23 Jun 2014
net-misc/yandex-disk pinkbyte 24 Jun 2014
sec-policy/selinux-resolvconf swift 25 Jun 2014
dev-python/json-rpc chutzpah 26 Jun 2014
app-backup/cyphertite grknight 26 Jun 2014
dev-python/jdcal idella4 26 Jun 2014
net-libs/libcrafter jer 26 Jun 2014
net-analyzer/tracebox jer 26 Jun 2014
dev-python/python-catcher jlec 27 Jun 2014
dev-python/python-exconsole jlec 27 Jun 2014
dev-python/reconfigure jlec 27 Jun 2014
sys-block/sas2ircu robbat2 27 Jun 2014
sys-block/sas3ircu robbat2 27 Jun 2014
dev-ruby/psych mrueg 27 Jun 2014

Bugzilla

The Gentoo community uses Bugzilla to record and track bugs, notifications, suggestions and other interactions with the development team.

Activity

The following tables and charts summarize the activity on Bugzilla between 31 May 2014 and 30 June 2014. Not fixed means bugs that were resolved as NEEDINFO, WONTFIX, CANTFIX, INVALID or UPSTREAM.

Bug Activity Number
New 1991
Closed 1065
Not fixed 171
Duplicates 147
Total 5843
Blocker 5
Critical 18
Major 64

Closed bug ranking

The following table outlines the teams and developers with the most bugs resolved during this period

Rank Team/Developer Bug Count
1 Gentoo Security 152
2 Gentoo Linux Gnome Desktop Team 54
3 Python Gentoo Team 39
4 Gentoo KDE team 33
5 Gentoo Games 28
6 Gentoo Ruby Team 20
7 Default Assignee for Orphaned Packages 20
8 media-video herd 17
9 Julian Ospald (hasufell) 17
10 Others 684

Assigned bug ranking

The developers and teams who have been assigned the most bugs during this period are as follows.

Rank Team/Developer Bug Count
1 Gentoo Security 97
2 Gentoo Linux Gnome Desktop Team 91
3 Gentoo Linux bug wranglers 91
4 Python Gentoo Team 70
5 Gentoo Games 64
6 Gentoo KDE team 50
7 Gentoo Prefix 49
8 Default Assignee for Orphaned Packages 49
9 Gentoo's Team for Core System packages 35
10 Others 1394

Tips of the month

(by Sven Vermeulen)
Quick one-time patching of packages

If you want to patch a package once (for instance to test a patch provided through bugzilla), just start building the package, but when the following is shown, interrupt it (Ctrl-Z):

>>> Source prepared.

Then go to the builddir (like /var/tmp/portage/net-misc/tor-0.2.4.22/work/tor-0.2.4.22) and apply the patch. Then continue the build (with “fg” command).

Verify integrity of installed software

If you don’t want the full-fledged features of tools like AIDE, you can use qcheck to verify this for installed packages:
~# qcheck -e vim-core
Checking app-editors/vim-core-7.4.273 ...
MD5-DIGEST: /usr/share/vim/vim74/doc/tags
* 1783 out of 1784 files are good

Send us your favorite Gentoo script or tip at gmn@gentoo.org

Getting Involved?

Interested in helping out? The GMN relies on volunteers and members of the community for content every month. If you are interested in writing for the GMN or thinking of another way to contribute, please send an e-mail to gmn@gentoo.org.

Comments or Suggestions?

Please head over to this forum post.

July 02, 2014
Sven Vermeulen a.k.a. swift (homepage, bugs)
Multilib in Gentoo (July 02, 2014, 19:03 UTC)

One of the areas in Gentoo that is seeing lots of active development is its ongoing effort to have proper multilib support throughout the tree. In the past, this support was provided through special emulation packages, but those have the (serious) downside that they are often outdated, sometimes even having security issues.

But this active development is not because we all just started looking in the same direction. No, it’s thanks to a few developers that have put their shoulders under this effort, directing the development workload where needed and pressing other developers to help in this endeavor. And pushing is more than just creating bugreports and telling developers to do something.

It is also about communicating, giving feedback and patiently helping developers when they have questions.

I can only hope that other activities within Gentoo and its potential broad impact work on this as well. Kudos to all involved, as well as all developers that have undoubtedly put numerous hours of development effort in the hope to make their ebuilds multilib-capable (I know I had to put lots of effort in it, but I find it is worthwhile and a big learning opportunity).

Anthony Basile a.k.a. blueness (homepage, bugs)

A few years back the Lemote Yeeloong made a splash in the open source community as the world’s first completely “open” system requiring no proprietary software.  Even its BIOS is open source.  It wasn’t long before pictures of Richard Stallman hugging his Yeeloong started popping up throughout the Internet, further boosting its popularity.  I became interested because the Yeeloong involves everything that’s near and dear to my heart: 1) Its loongson2f processor is a mips64el system and I love the slick nature of RISC architectures.  I can actually make sense of its ISA and the assembly.  2) As a 64-bit mips, it supports multiple ABIs, and I love playing with different ABIs.  The images I push come with o32, n32 and n64.  3) While other distros, like Debian, have ported their wares to the Yeeloong, these don’t have the hardening goodness that Gentoo does and so this was an added challenge.  Thanks to Magnus Granberg (zorry) for getting his hardened gcc patches work in mips.  4) Finally, it is “free” as in “libre”.  It is manufactured by Lemote in China, and I like to fantisize that hackers at the NSA curse everytime they encounter one in the wild, although the reality is more likely that I’m owned by the Chinese government :/

So here was the possibility of creating a free and secure system on my favorite architecture!  A couple of summers back, I took on the challenge.  I updated some older stages3 that Matt Turner (mattst88) had prepared and went through the process of seeing what desktop packages would build, which needed patching and which were hopelessly broken on mips, usually because of dependance on x86/amd64 assembly.  The end result was a minimal XFCE4 desktop with full userland hardening.  Unfortunatley, I still don’t have a PaX kernel working, but the issues do not appear to be insurmountable.

Building the initial images was more fun than maintaining them, but I’ve been good about it and I recently prepared release 20140630.  I even started to feel out the community more, so I announced this work as a project on freecode.com, just before the site closed down :(   If you get  a new Lemote Yeeloong, give these images a try.  It’ll save you about 4 days of compiling if you want to bootstrap from a stage3 to a full desktop, not counting all the broken packages you’ll probably hit along the way.  If you’re already running one of my images then you can try to update on your own but expect a lot of conflicts/blockings etc since mips is not a stable arch.  Perhaps the next step to making this more user-friendly is for me to provide the binpkgs on some host.

 

June 29, 2014
Pavlos Ratis a.k.a. dastergon (homepage, bugs)
Accepted for Google Summer of Code 2014 (June 29, 2014, 21:00 UTC)

This year I’ve been accepted for Google Summer of Code 2014 with Gentoo Foundation for the Gentoo Keys project and my mentor will be Brian Dolbec (dol-sen). Gentoo Keys is a Python based project that aims to manage the GPG keys used for validation on users and Gentoo’s infrastructure servers. These keys will be any/all of the release keys, developer keys and any other third party keys or keyrings available or needed.

Participating in large communities and being a developer has great responsibilities. Developers have access to commit their new changes to the main repository, however, even an unintended incorrect commit in the main repository would affect the majority of the users. This issue could be addressed easily by the developer that did the mistake instantly. A less innocent case is that if a developer’s box is compromised, then the malicious user could commit malicious changes freely to the main tree. To prevent this kind of incidents, developers are requested to sign their own commits with their GPG key in order to ensure who they claim to be. It’s an extra layer of protection that helps to keep the integrity of the main repository. Gentoo Keys aims to solve that and provides its features in many scenarios like overlays and release engineering management.

Gentoo Keys will be able to verify GPG keys used for Gentoo’s release media, such as installation CD’s, Live DVD’s, packages and other GPG signed documents. In addition, it will be used by Gentoo infrastructure team to achieve GPG signed git commits in the forthcoming git migration of the main CVS tree.

Gentoo Keys is an open source project which has its code available from the very first day in Gentoo’s official repositories. Everyone is welcome to provide patches and request new features.

Source code: https://github.com/gentoo/gentoo-keys.
Weekly Reports are posted here.
Wiki page: https://wiki.gentoo.org/wiki/Project:Gentoo-keys.

Accepted for Google Summer of Code 2014 was originally published by Pavlos Ratis at dastergon's weblog on June 30, 2014.

June 25, 2014
Patrick Lauer a.k.a. bonsaikitten (homepage, bugs)
Building Everything (June 25, 2014, 06:27 UTC)

Preparation:

  • Take recent stage3 and unpack to a temporary location
  • Set up things: make.conf, resolv.conf, keywords, ...
  • Update @system, check gcc version etc.
  • Clone this snapshot to 4 locations (4 because of CPU cores)
  • bindmount /usr/portage and friends
Run: Start a screen session for each clone. Chroot in. Apply magic oneliner:
for i in $( qsearch -NC --all | sort -R ); do 
    if $( emerge --nodeps -pk $i > /dev/null ) ; then 
        emerge --depclean; echo $i; emerge -uNDk1 $i; 
    fi; 
done
Wait 4-5 days, get >10k binary packages, lots of logfiles.

Space usage:
~2.5G logfiles
~35G distfiles
~20G binary packages
~100G temp space (/var/tmp has lots of cruft unless FEATURES="fail-clean")


Triage of these logfiles yields about 1% build failures, on average.
It's not hard to do, just tedious!

make.conf additions:
FEATURES="buildpkg split-log -news"
PORT_LOGDIR="/var/log/portage/"
MAKEOPTS="-j4"
EMERGE_DEFAULT_OPTS="--jobs 4"

CLEAN_DELAY="0"
EMERGE_WARNING_DELAY="0"
ACCEPT_PROPERTIES="* -interactive"

June 24, 2014
Sebastian Pipping a.k.a. sping (homepage, bugs)

Since Adobe has stopped developing Flash for Firefox and Mozilla has no plans to support the Pepper plug-in API, Rinat Ibragimov is developing a wrapper to use Google Chrome’s Pepper-based Flash plug-in with Mozilla Firefox:

GitHub: i-rinat/freshplayerplugin

A live ebuild is now available in the “betagarden” overlay. Users of non-stable Chrome can edit the plug-in path in /etc/freshwrapper.conf.

Interestingly, freshplayerplugin makes use of my library uriparser for URI handling. Very nice! :)

June 23, 2014
Michał Górny a.k.a. mgorny (homepage, bugs)
Inlining -march=native for distcc (June 23, 2014, 15:26 UTC)

-march=native is a gcc flag that enables auto-detection of CPU architecture and properties. Not only it allows you to avoid finding the correct value of -march= but also enables instruction sets that do not fit any standard CPU profile and detects the cache sizes.

Sadly, -march=native itself can’t really work well with distcc. Since the detection is performed when compiling, remote gcc invocations would use the architecture of the distcc host rather than the client. Therefore, the resulting executables would be a mix of different architectures used by distcc.

You may also find -march=native a bit opaque. For example, we had multiple bug reports about LLVM failing to build with -march=atom. However, some of the reporters were using -march=native, so we wasn’t able to immediately identify the duplicates.

In this article, I will guide you shortly on replacing -march=native with expanded compiler flags, for the benefit of distcc compatibility and more explicit build logs.

Obtaining the native flags from gcc

The first step towards replacing -march=native is to determine which flags are enabled by it. Various people suggest multiple ways of obtaining -march=native flags. For example, you can use the following call:

$ gcc -### -march=native -x c -
Using built-in specs.
COLLECT_GCC=/usr/x86_64-pc-linux-gnu/gcc-bin/4.8.3/gcc
COLLECT_LTO_WRAPPER=/usr/libexec/gcc/x86_64-pc-linux-gnu/4.8.3/lto-wrapper
Target: x86_64-pc-linux-gnu
[…]
Thread model: posix
gcc version 4.8.3 (Gentoo 4.8.3 p1.1, pie-0.5.9) 
COLLECT_GCC_OPTIONS='-march=native'
 /usr/libexec/gcc/x86_64-pc-linux-gnu/4.8.3/cc1 -quiet - "-march=k8-sse3" -mcx16 -msahf -mno-movbe -mno-aes -mno-pclmul -mno-popcnt -mno-abm -mno-lwp -mno-fma -mno-fma4 -mno-xop -mno-bmi -mno-bmi2 -mno-tbm -mno-avx -mno-avx2 -mno-sse4.2 -mno-sse4.1 -mno-lzcnt -mno-rtm -mno-hle -mno-rdrnd -mno-f16c -mno-fsgsbase -mno-rdseed -mno-prfchw -mno-adx -mfxsr -mno-xsave -mno-xsaveopt --param "l1-cache-size=64" --param "l1-cache-line-size=64" --param "l2-cache-size=512" "-mtune=k8" -quiet -dumpbase - -auxbase - -fstack-protector -o /tmp/cckZDyUR.s
[…]

For those more curious, a similar call can be made with -x c++ for the C++ compiler flags. The expanded optimization flags can be found in the cc1 (or cc1plus in case of C++) command line. I have highlighted the relevant flags — usually you’re looking for various -m flags and --params related to caches.

You may also notice -fstack-protector there. This is because nowadays Gentoo enables it by default. If you are using a non-Gentoo distcc host (why would you have a non-Gentoo host in the first place?), you may want to pass it explicitly as well.

You may find the above output a bit oververbose. While this technically isn’t a problem, it clutters the build logs. So, let’s filter it a bit.

Filtering out redundant flags

Most of the -m flags listed above are redundant, being either equivalent to the defaults, or enabled implicitly by -march. For example, on the host providing the example output none of -mno-* flags were actually required, and -msahf was enabled implicitly.

You can safely assume that in Gentoo all -m flags are disabled by default. To find out what flags are implied by the -march, let's look at gcc sources.

$ tar -xf /var/cache/portage/distfiles/gcc-4.8.3.tar.bz2
$ find gcc-4.8.3/gcc/config -name '*.c' -exec grep k8-sse3 {} +
gcc-4.8.3/gcc/config/i386/i386.c:      {"k8-sse3", PROCESSOR_K8, CPU_K8,
gcc-4.8.3/gcc/config/i386/driver-i386.c:	cpu = "k8-sse3";

The first file has what we're looking for. Inside, you can find:

      {"k8-sse3", PROCESSOR_K8, CPU_K8,
	PTA_64BIT | PTA_MMX | PTA_3DNOW | PTA_3DNOW_A | PTA_SSE
	| PTA_SSE2 | PTA_SSE3 | PTA_NO_SAHF | PTA_PRFCHW | PTA_FXSR},

So -march=k8-sse3 would enable -mmmx, -m3dnow, -msse and so on. If you compare this list with the output obtained before, you'd notice that the -march option didn't enable any flags that would need to be disabled explicitly, so all -mno-* flags can be omitted. Similarly, -mfxsr is redundant. But -mcx16 and -msahf seem relevant since the former is not listed there at all, and the latter is disabled by default.

After filtering out the unnecessary flags, we can create both distcc- and eye-friendly CFLAGS like:

CFLAGS='-O2 -pipe -march=k8-sse3 -mcx16 -msahf -param l1-cache-size=64 --param l1-cache-line-size=64 --param l2-cache-size=512'

June 18, 2014
Diego E. Pettenò a.k.a. flameeyes (homepage, bugs)
A new XBMC box (June 18, 2014, 22:07 UTC)

A couple of months ago I was at LinuxTag in Berlin with the friends from VIdeoLAN and we shared a booth with the XBMC project. It was interesting to see the newest version of XBMC running, and I decided that it was time for me to get a new XBMC box — last time I used XBMC was on my AppleTV and while it was not strictly disappointing it was not terrific either after a while.

At any rate, we spoke about what options are available nowadays to make a good XBMC set up, and while the RaspberryPi is all the rage nowadays, my previous experience with the platform made it a no-go. It also requires you to find a place where to store your data (the USB support on the Pi is not good for many things) and you most likely will have to re-encode animes to the Right Format™ so that the RPi VideoCore can properly decode them: anything that can't be hardware-accelerated will not play on such a limited hardware.

The alternative has been the Intel NUC (Next Unit of Computing), which Intel sells in pre-configured "barebone" kits, some of which include wifi antennas, 2.5" disk bays, and a CIR (Consumer Infrared Receiver) that allows you to use a remote such as the one for the XBox 360 to control the unit. I decided to look into the options and I settled on the D54250WYKH which has a Core i5 CPU, space for both a wireless card (I got the Intel 7260 802.11ac which is dual-radio and supports the new 11ac protocol, even though my router is not 11ac yet), and a mSATA SSD (I got a Transcend 128GB one), as well the 2.5" bay that allows me to use a good old spinning-rust harddrive to store the bulk of the data.

Be careful and don't repeat my mistake! I originally ordered a very cool Western Digital Caviar Green 2TB HDD but while it is a 2.5" HDD, it does not fit properly in the provided cradle; the same problem used to happen with the first series of 1TB HDDs on PlayStation 3s. I decided to keep the HDD and bring it with me to Ireland, as I don't otherwise have a 2TB HDD, instead I opted for a HGST 1.5TB HDD (no link for this one as I bought it at Fry's the same day I picked up the rest, if nothing else because I had no will to wait, and also because I forgot I needed a keyboard).

While I could have just put OpenELEC on the device, I decided instead to install my trusted Gentoo — a Core i5 with 16GB of RAM and a good SSD is well in its ability to run it. And since I was finally setting something up that needs (for myself) to turn on very quickly, I decided to give systemd a go (especially as Robbins is now considered a co-maintainer for OpenRC which drains all my will to keep using it). The effect has been stunning, but there are a few issues that needs to be ironed out; for instance, as far as I can tell, there is no unit for rngd which means that both my laptop (now converted to systemd) and the device have no entropy, even though they both have the rdrand instruction; I'll try to fix this lack myself.

Another huge problem for me has been getting the audio to work; while I've been told by the XBMC people that the NUC are perfectly well supported, I couldn't for the sake of me get the audio to work for days. At the end it was Alexander Patrakov who pointed out to intel_iommu=on,igfx_off as a kernel option to get it to work (kernel bug #67321 still unfixed). So if you have no HDMI output on your NUC, that's what you have to do!

Speaking about XBMC and Gentoo, the latest version as of last week (which was not the latest upstream version, as a new one got released exactly while I was installing the box), seem to force you to install FFmpeg over libav – I honestly felt a bit sorry for the developers of XBMC at LinuxTag while they were trying to tell me how the multi-threaded h264 decoder from FFmpeg is great… Anton, who wrote it, is a libav developer! – but even after you do that, it seems like it does not link it in, preferring a bundled copy of it instead. Which also doesn't seem to build support for multithread (uh?). This is something that I'll have to look into once I'm back in Dublin.

Other than that, there isn't much to say; the one remaining big issue is to figure out how to properly have XBMC start up at boot without nasty autologin hacks on systemd. And of course finding a better way than using a transmission user to start the Transmission daemon, or at least find a better way to share the downloads with XBMC itself. Probably separating the XBMC and Transmission users is a good idea.

Expect more posts on what's going on with my XBMC box in the future, and take this one as a reference about the NUC audio issue.

June 17, 2014
Patrick Lauer a.k.a. bonsaikitten (homepage, bugs)
EAPI statistics, again (June 17, 2014, 07:13 UTC)

Start: Thu Jan 16 08:18:45 UTC 2014
End:   Mon Jun 16 00:00:01 UTC 2014

EAPI 0:   5966 ebuilds (15.78 percent) ->  5477 ebuilds (14.40 percent)
EAPI 1:    370 ebuilds (0.98 percent)  ->   215 ebuilds ( 0.57 percent)
EAPI 2:   3335 ebuilds (8.82 percent)  ->  2938 ebuilds ( 7.72 percent)
EAPI 3:   3005 ebuilds (7.95 percent)  ->  2585 ebuilds ( 6.79 percent)
EAPI 4:  12385 ebuilds (32.76 percent) -> 10375 ebuilds (27.27 percent)
EAPI 5:  12742 ebuilds (33.71 percent) -> 16455 ebuilds (43.25 percent)
Total    37803 -> 38045

EAPI 0 change:  -8.2%
EAPI 1 change: -58.1%
EAPI 2 change: -11.9%
EAPI 3 change: -14.0%
EAPI 4 change: -16.2%
EAPI 5 change: +29.1%
So over the last 5 months we had about 2% increase in the total amount of ebuilds. The only growing class is EAPI5, which is quite excellent.

EAPI 0 is the slowest decreasing, as long as there's no coordinated effort to get rid of it it'll be there forever. EAPI1 is now very close to extinction.

EAPI 2,3 and 4 are slowly shrinking away, but at this rate it'll still take years.

June 16, 2014
Gentoo Haskell Herd a.k.a. haskell (homepage, bugs)
unsafePerformIO and missing NOINLINE (June 16, 2014, 16:10 UTC)

Two months ago Ivan asked me if we had working darcs-2.8 for ghc-7.8 in gentoo. We had a workaround to compile darcs to that day, but darcs did not work reliably. Sometimes it needed 2-3 attempts to pull a repository.

A bit later I’ve decided to actually look at failure case (Issued on darcs bugtracker) and do something about it. My idea to debug the mystery was simple: to reproduce the difference on the same source for ghc-7.6/7.8 and start plugging debug info unless difference I can understand will pop up.

Darcs has great debug-verbose option for most of commands. I used debugMessage function to litter code with more debugging statements unless complete horrible image would emerge.

As you can see in bugtracker issue I posted there various intermediate points of what I thought went wrong (don’t expect those comments to have much sense).

The immediate consequence of a breakage was file overwrite of partially downloaded file. The event timeline looked simple:

  • darcs scheduled for download the same file twice (two jobs in download queue)
  • first download job did finish
  • notified waiter started processing of that downloaded temp file
  • second download started truncating previous complete download
  • notified waiter continued processing partially downloadeed file and detected breakage

Thus first I’ve decided to fix the consequence. It did not fix problems completely, sometimes darcs pull complained about remote repositories still being broken (missing files), but it made errors saner (only remote side was allegedly at fault).

Ideally, that file overwrite should not happen in the first place. Partially, it was temp file predictability.

But, OK. Then i’ve started digging why 7.6/7.8 request download patterns were so severely different. At first I thought of new IO manager being a cause of difference. The paper says it fixed haskell thread scheduling issue (paper is nice even for leisure reading!):

GHC’s RTS had a bug in which yield
placed the thread back on the front of the run queue. This bug
was uncovered by our use of yield
which requires that the thread
be placed at the end of the run queue

Thus I was expecting the bug from this side.

Then being determined to dig A Lot in darcs source code I’ve decided to disable optimizations (-O0) to speedup rebuilds. And, the bug has vanished.

That made the click: unsafePerformIO might be the real problem. I’ve grepped for all unsafePerformIO instances and examined all definition sites.

Two were especially interesting:

-- src/Darcs/Util/Global.hs
-- ...
_crcWarningList :: IORef CRCWarningList
_crcWarningList = unsafePerformIO $ newIORef []
{-# NOINLINE _crcWarningList #-}
-- ...
_badSourcesList :: IORef [String]
_badSourcesList = unsafePerformIO $ newIORef []
{- NOINLINE _badSourcesList -}
-- ...

Did you spot the bug?

Thus The Proper Fix was pushed upstream a month ago. Which means ghc is now able to inline things more aggressively (and _badSourcesList were inlined in all user sites, throwing out all update sites).

I don’t know if those newIORef [] can be de-CSEd if types would have the same representation. Ideally the module also needs -fno-cse, or get rid of unsafePerformIO completely :].

(Side thought: top-level global variables in C style are surprisingly non-trivial in "pure" haskell. They are easy to use via peek / poke (in a racy way), but are hard to declare / initialize.)

I had a question wondered how many haskell packages manage to misspell ghc pragma decparations in a way darcs did it. And there still _is_ a few of such offenders:

$ fgrep -R NOINLINE . | grep -v '{-# NOINLINE' | grep '{-'
--
ajhc-0.8.0.10/lib/jhc/Jhc/List.hs:{- NOINLINE filterFB #-}
ajhc-0.8.0.10/lib/jhc/Jhc/List.hs:{- NOINLINE iterateFB #-}
ajhc-0.8.0.10/lib/jhc/Jhc/List.hs:{- NOINLINE mapFB #-}
--
darcs-2.8.4/src/Darcs/Global.hs:{- NOINLINE _badSourcesList -}
darcs-2.8.4/src/Darcs/Global.hs:{- NOINLINE _reachableSourcesList -}
--
dph-lifted-copy-0.7.0.1/Data/Array/Parallel.hs:{- NOINLINE emptyP #-}
--
dph-par-0.5.1.1/Data/Array/Parallel.hs:{- NOINLINE emptyP #-}
--
dph-seq-0.5.1.1/Data/Array/Parallel.hs:{- NOINLINE emptyP #-}
--
freesect-0.8/FreeSectAnnotated.hs:{- # NOINLINE showSSI #-}
freesect-0.8/FreeSectAnnotated.hs:{- # NOINLINE FreeSectAnnotated.showSSI #-}
freesect-0.8/FreeSect.hs:{- # NOINLINE fs_warn_flaw #-}
--
http-proxy-0.0.8/Network/HTTP/Proxy/ReadInt.hs:{- NOINLINE readInt64MH #-}
http-proxy-0.0.8/Network/HTTP/Proxy/ReadInt.hs:{- NOINLINE mhDigitToInt #-}
--
lhc-0.10/lib/base/src/GHC/PArr.hs:{- NOINLINE emptyP #-}
--
property-list-0.1.0.2/src/Data/PropertyList/Binary/Float.hs:{- NOINLINE doubleToWord64 -}
property-list-0.1.0.2/src/Data/PropertyList/Binary/Float.hs:{- NOINLINE word64ToDouble -}
property-list-0.1.0.2/src/Data/PropertyList/Binary/Float.hs:{- NOINLINE floatToWord32 -}
property-list-0.1.0.2/src/Data/PropertyList/Binary/Float.hs:{- NOINLINE word32ToFloat -}
--
warp-2.0.3.3/Network/Wai/Handler/Warp/ReadInt.hs:{- NOINLINE readInt64MH #-}
warp-2.0.3.3/Network/Wai/Handler/Warp/ReadInt.hs:{- NOINLINE mhDigitToInt #-}

Looks like there is yet something to fix :]

Would be great if hlint would be able to detect pragma-like comments and warn when comment contents is a valid pragma, but comment brackets don’t allow it to fire.

{- NOINLINE foo -} -- bad
{- NOINLINE foo #-} -- bad
{-# NOINLINE foo -} -- bad
{-# NOINLINE foo #-} -- ok

Thanks for reading!


June 15, 2014
Sven Vermeulen a.k.a. swift (homepage, bugs)
Gentoo Hardened, June 2014 (June 15, 2014, 19:28 UTC)

Friday the Gentoo Hardened project had its monthly online meeting to talk about the progress within the various tools, responsibilities and subprojects.

On the toolchain part, Zorry mentioned that GCC 4.9 and 4.8.3 will have SSP enabled by default. The hardened profiles will still have a different SSP setting than the default (so yes, there will still be differences between the two) but this will help in securing the Gentoo default installations.

Zorry is also working on upstreaming the PIE patches for GCC 4.10.

Next to the regular toolchain, blueness also mentioned his intentions to launch a Hardened musl subproject which will focus on the musl C library (rather than glibc or uclibc) and hardening.

On the kernel side, two recent kernel vulnerabilities in the vanilla kernel Linux (pty race and privilege escalation through futex code) painted the discussions on IRC recently. Some versions of the hardened kernels are still available in the tree, but the more recent (non-vulnerable) kernels have proven not to be as stable as we’d hoped.

The pty race vulnerability is possibly not applicable to hardened kernels thanks to grSecurity, due to its protection to access the kernel symbols.

The latest kernels should not be used with KSTACKOVERFLOW on production systems though; there are some issues reported with virtio network interface support (on the guests) and ZFS.

Also, on the Pax support, the install-xattr saga continues. The new wrapper that blueness worked in dismissed some code to keep the PWD so the $S directory knowledge was “lost”. This is now fixed. All that is left is to have the wrapper included and stabilized.

On SELinux side, it was the usual set of progress. Policy stabilization and user land application and library stabilization. The latter is waiting a bit because of the multilib support that’s now being integrated in the ebuilds as well (and thus has a larger set of dependencies to go through) but no show-stoppers there. Also, the SELinux documentation portal on the wiki was briefly mentioned.

Also, the policycoreutils vulnerability has been worked around so it is no longer applicable to us.

On the hardened profiles, we had a nice discussion on enabling capabilities support (and move towards capabilities instead of setuid binaries), which klondike will try to tackle during the summer holidays.

As I didn’t take notes during the meeting, this post might miss a few (and I forgot to enable logging as well) but as Zorry sends out the meeting logs anyway later, you can read up there ;-)

June 13, 2014
Patrick Lauer a.k.a. bonsaikitten (homepage, bugs)
A one-line Tinderbox (June 13, 2014, 08:33 UTC)

Needs portage-utils, best to run in a chroot:

for i in $( qsearch --all -CN | sort -R ); do emerge -1 $i; emerge --depclean; done

June 10, 2014
Andreas K. Hüttel a.k.a. dilfridge (homepage, bugs)
Please test =app-admin/perl-cleaner-2.14 (June 10, 2014, 20:26 UTC)

We've made a few small updates to perl-cleaner that should get you around subslot issues much better in the future.
If you are planning to do any major Perl update on your Gentoo box in the near future, please as a first step update to =app-admin/perl-cleaner-2.14, which is currently in ~arch but in my opinion a good stabilization candidate. This will hopefully give you a much better upgrade of your Perl modules.
Of course any feedback is appreciated, and if you encounter problems, please file bugs! If nothing unexpected happens, =app-admin/perl-cleaner-2.14 will go stable in a month.

June 06, 2014
Remi Cardona a.k.a. remi (homepage, bugs)

A couple of days ago, like everyone using ~arch, I upgraded my Gnome desktop to 3.12. Though a few packages failed to build, the upgrade itself went pretty smooth. Hats off to the Gnome herders.

Overall, 3.12 feels like a solid and well put together release. There were a few disappointments. The biggest of which being the removal of changing tab titles in gnome-terminal. I’ll spare everyone a long rant but this is feature I have been using extensively for the better part of a decade and I’m very disappointed to see this useful features go away without much justification. Material for another blog post… maybe.

One thing I did notice really quickly is the new geolocation entry in the shell’s main top-right menu. Not being a fan of geolocation, I went out to see how I could turn it off by default system-wide as my system has more than one regular user.

Going through dconf-editor, I found the correct setting key: org.gnome.shell.location.max-accuracy-level. This key is an enum and the correct value (at least to my taste) is ‘off’. Setting this for each user is a matter of running “gsettings set”. However, to change the default value, a little elbow grease is required.

GLib’s GSettings is actually an API for various backends. The one we use on Linux is dconf. So this is what I’ll have to bang on. This https://wiki.gnome.org/action/show/Projects/dconf/SystemAdministrators basically has all the reasoning behind it all. I’ll just summarize what I did.

  1. Create a /etc/dconf/profile/user with the following content:
    user-db:user
    system-db:site
  2. Create a matching ‘site’ settings database (I could have called it anything really) in /etc/dconf/db/site.d/ containing my new default settings file ’00_settings’
    [org/gnome/shell/location]
    max-accuracy-level='off'
  3. Run ‘dconf-update’ which will translate the INI-like settings file into a binary dconf file ‘/etc/dconf/db/site’

Now, I assume GSettings did not pick up this new profile on its own, so I had to restart my session. But from there, all changes to the settings file followed by a ‘dconf update’ automatically propagates to running applications, gnome-shell included.

Overall, this was easier than I anticipated. Hope that helps anyone trying to do similar things.

Michael Palimaka a.k.a. kensington (homepage, bugs)
Reviving the tinderbox (June 06, 2014, 19:50 UTC)

tinderboxOne of the problems faced by the tinderbox of yesteryear is the picking information out of logs, as well as the reliance of one person to interpret the results. With this in mind, I’ve been doing some work to improve accessibility of this data and have produced a tinderbox interface.

A Portage bashrc (based on the original work by Diego Elio Pettenò) collects QA information about builds, and stores it in individual files to make it easier to operate on – eliminating a lot of the need to parse logs.

You’ll notice the interface lists all packages – not just those with a recent build. This allows for a central location to report static analysis information from tools such as repoman and pkgcore-checks. Other lesser-known tools are supported, with experimental reporting of sub-slot candidates and automated dependency checking.

What’s next? I’d like to add ways to find packages beyond the usual category breakdown – such as by maintainer or builds by architecture. There’s more build-time checks to add, and I’m sure there’s other static analysis tools out there too. I don’t personally have the resources to build packages at the scale seen previously, so last but of course not least, more building power is needed. Fortunately, it’s quite easy to collate the tinderbox data from multiple sources so we may be able to ‘crowd-source’ if necessary.

As always, comments/feedback/suggestions welcome.

Hello users,

TL;DR: x86 (32bit) support is going away soon, if you use Sabayon x86_64 (64bit), you can ignore this.

in an effort of decreasing our computing and human capacity requirements, I am going to start the process that deprecates Sabayon x86 (32bit) images, package repositories and their support.
x86_64 (or AMD64) has been introduced one decade ago. Yes, it was 2004, pretty much the same year I started messing with a binary Gentoo-based distro.

It’s time to move on, free up resources and focus on what matters. 32bit is not important anymore and modern computers come with tons of GB of RAM. At the same time, I don’t see x32 going anywhere. Instead, I see the need to standardize on one single x86 architecture. Some distributions have started doing the same, for instance, RHEL 7 will not see any 32bit version. Windows 8, well, yes, said goodbye to 32bit as well.

If you are still stuck with 32bit CPUs, there are 5 things you could do:

  1. Make sure that your CPU does not really support x86_64. You may be surprised to know that it might run x86_64 code just fine.
  2. Given our deprecation roadmap, migrate your stuff over a more recent system. eBay, Amazon, are your friends. A second-hand x86_64 system can cost you less than $100.
  3. Migrate to other distros and pray they won’t kill 32bit anytime soon (time is not in your favor).
  4. Migrate your Sabayon system to Gentoo/Portage, basically compiling your own stuff. Alternatively, setup your own Entropy repository in order to keep your system up-to-date.
  5. Burn your motherboard and CPU by doing insane overclocking and then, when they die, violently hit them with a hammer while screaming “You shall not compute!”.

Our deprecation roadmap is as follows:

  • June 2014: stop offering x86 images off our download pages, keep them on mirrors.
  • July/August 2014: stop building x86 images as part of our daily and monthly release rollout.
  • October 2014: stop offering x86 images from our mirrors.
  • November 2014: stop offering package updates, including security updates, for x86 images.
  • January 2015: stop offering packages from our mirrors.

After January 2015, you will not be able to install new packages as well. The only way to keep your system up-to-date is to use Portage (plus our overlays) or Entropy (by maintaining your own repository). Our x86_64 images are multilib, which means that you can run 32bit code on them just fine.


June 04, 2014
Alexys Jacob a.k.a. ultrabug (homepage, bugs)
Consul on Gentoo Linux (June 04, 2014, 21:10 UTC)

As a clustering and distributed architecture enthusiast, I’m naturally interested in software providing neat ways to coordinate any kind of state/configuration/you-name-it over a large number of machines.

My quest, as many of you I guess, were so far limited to tools like zookeeper (packaged on my overlay but with almost no echo) and doozerd (last commit nearly 6 months ago) which both cover some of the goals listed above with more or less flavors and elegance (sorry guys, JAVA is NOT elegant to me).

I recently heard about consul, a new attempt to solve some of those problems in an interesting way while providing some rich fuctionnalities so I went on giving it a try and naturally started packaging it so others can too.

WTF is consul ?

consul logo

Consul is a few months’ old project (and already available on Gentoo !) from the guys making Vagrant. I especially like its datacenter centric architecture, intuitive deployment and its DNS + HTTP API query mecanisms. This sounds promising so far !

This is a descripion taken from the Hashicorp’s blog :

Consul is a solution for service discovery and configuration. Consul is completely distributed, highly available, and scales to thousands of nodes and services across multiple datacenters.

Some concrete problems Consul solves: finding the services applications need (database, queue, mail server, etc.), configuring services with key/value information such as enabling maintenance mode for a web application, and health checking services so that unhealthy services aren’t used. These are just a handful of important problems Consul addresses.

Consul solves the problem of service discovery and configuration. Built on top of a foundation of rigorous academic research, Consul keeps your data safe and works with the largest of infrastructures. Consul embraces modern practices and is friendly to existing DevOps tooling.

app-admin/consul ?

This is a RFC and interest call about the packaging and availability of consul for Gentoo Linux.

The latest version and live ebuilds are present in my overlay so if you are interested, please tell me (here, IRC, email, whatever) and I’ll consider adding it to the portage tree.

I want to test it !

Now that would be helpful to get some feedback about the usability of the current packaging. So far the ebuild features what I think should cover a lot of use cases :

  • full build from sources
  • customizable consul agent init script with reload, telemetry and graceful stop support
  • web UI built from sources and installation for easy deployment
# layman -a ultrabug
# emerge -av consul

Hope this interests some of you folks !

Gentoo Monthly Newsletter - May 2014 (June 04, 2014, 08:02 UTC)

The May 2014 GMN issue is now available online.

This month on GMN:

  • Interview with Gentoo developer Brian Dolbec (dol-sen)
  • Samba 4, sys-power/upower updates, infrastructure hosting needs
  • Latest Gentoo news, tips, interesting stats and much more.

June 02, 2014
Gentoo Monthly Newsletter: May 2014 (June 02, 2014, 21:00 UTC)

Gentoo News

Interview with Brian Dolbec (dol-sen)

by David Abbott

1. Hi Brian, tell us about yourself.

I’m a wannabe scientist/inventor that never did take the full plunge into that career path.
I’m married with 28 and 14 year old daughters, four dogs, one cat, several aquariums of fish…
And despite what many readers or other developers may expect or think: I’m not in an IT career. I’m a journeyman refrigeration mechanic with a gas ticket. I install, repair furnaces, rooftop heating/cooling equipment, computer room cooling systems etc.

2. Bring us back to your start with electronics and computers.

I’ve been taking things apart, seeing how they are built, and work since I was 9 or 10 years old.
Things from really old tube radios, appliances, etc.When I was in 7th grade, my teachers wife worked taking care of people in a care home. One of her patients was an electronics teacher crippled with polio. He asked a classmate and myself if we would to help him with things from repairing, modifying his HAM and CB radio equipment, to modifying his home built 3 wheel vehicle that he steered with buttons under his elbows.
Computer work started years later, my first machine was a used Atari 400 with a cassette player drive. Programming in basic. I had an apple IIe compatible for a year or so, then while returning to college, taking science (physics, chemistry) and computer programming courses (mostly coded in pascal) on a VAX 11 and/or x86 pc’s, my next one was an Atari 520ST (first production run) which I still have today.

3. How did you get involved with open source?

After installing gentoo, I had soon started working on porthole which was a new project at that time. I was also new to python and had not done any coding in many years. It was primarily porthole that brought me to doing work in gentoolkit, layman, portage and other tools in gentoo.

4. What path did you take to become a Gentoo developer?

I had been working around portage for many years with porthole development. Which led me to begin working on gentoolkit in order to create working api’s for other tools to use. It was that and layman work that got me into helping mentor GSOC projects. I first became a staffer as I was a coder, not an ebuild developer. It was one year later I took the plunge and completed the developer quiz and became a full developer.

5. Tell us about your mentor and the process to become a developer?

There have been many people over the years that I’ve learned from.
But my most important mentor in developing my coding skills has been Brian Harring
His knowledge of how to do things in an efficient, fast way continues to amaze and inspire me.

6. What aspects of Gentoo do we need to keep and what could we get rid of?

hmm… Keep the good coding skills and efforts into improving Gentoo as a whole, get rid of the major bikeshedding over who’s right and who’s wrong…

7. Tell us about Porthole (The portage frontend) http://porthole.sourceforge.net/ and what skills you learned from it?

Python programming, knowledge of data acquisition using portage’s API’s, learning to do things with less code, more adaptable and robust with less long term maintenance required. I’ve rewritten areas of porthole’s code several times as it evolved and grew. Sadly, I’ve been neglecting porthole these past few years. I keep getting distracted with other projects in need of help, re-writes, updates, or even new projects like gentoo-keys which was spawned from dev-python/pyGPG which I created to handle gpg signed list verification for layman. Layman’s code also spawned a small new python lib (dev-python/ssl-fetch) that will be used in several tools soon. I split that code out of layman to re-use in mirrorselect for fetching files from api.gentoo.org.

8. You have become a proficient Python programmer, how did you do it?

Coding, making mistakes, fixing them. Learning better faster ways to accomplish something from others.
But, one of my key strong points is my ability to quickly see the big picture. The details you can figure out along the way with help from others as the need arises. Many new programmers get stuck focusing on the details without knowing how they should be put together. Hint, think of a jigsaw puzzle, when you get one, you have the finished picture on the box to use as a reference of what it should look like. This makes it easier to figure out where a piece might fit. The same holds true for any programming task. You need to know what the end goal is and how it might fit together. Adjustments are made along the way so that you end up with a completed code block, then you move along to the next one.

9. Walk me through the steps you do to write python code, test, and your editor of choice etc.

see above answer… Current preferred editor is Geany, 2nd is Scite which I used for many years and still do for some things.

10. Catalyst (the tool used for building Gentoo releases) is in the process of a major overhaul, what has been done, who is helping you and what needs to be completed?

I got started working on catalyst so that the default location for the portage tree (gentoo ebuild tree) can be relocated. The catalyst code base was in sad shape with paths hard-coded throughout the code. It even had paths used as both a variable name and value in places. Its code base still had (questionable to poor) code copied from early portage code which has long since been replaced. The code had also been modified by the releng team which (not being proficient in python) used bad examples to modify its operation. The bulk of the rewrite work has and is being done by Trevor King and myself. With others contributing to improvements, additions to portions of it. Currently I’m in the middle of migrating all the changes from a development branch (3.0) into the master branch of the repository. Once that is caught up, the rewrites will continue. There are still too many areas of code to improve or rewrite to list them here.

11. Tell us about your other projects you are currently working on?

Gentoo-keys – A gpg key management and verification tool. Designed to manage all aspects of Gentoo’s gpg keys, developer keys and verification of things like the release media, commits to Gentoo’s ebuild tree, layman’s repositories etc.

Mirrorselect – a mirror selection tool for Gentoo. I did the 2.2 re-write and some additional work adding more features in the 2.2.1 release.

Ssl-fetch – A breakout lib which wraps dev-python/requests code and does verified ssl fetching of files and handles use of headers and timestamps to prevent re-downloading of data which hasn’t been modified.

pyGPG – A universal gnupg wrapper lib that is capable of mining all data available from gpg calls and puts that info into python available data types.

Layman – overlay management tool.

Portage – I am the current (temporary) lead after Zac took an extended break from gentoo. I am spear-heading a new plugin-sync system for it which will make portage more versatile and ease future maintenance and make it expandable with third party installable sync modules. You can look forward to a possible squashfs sync module. Work is being done to have Gentoo’s infrastructure be able to supply sqaushfs tree images. So encourage Micheal Gorny and the Gentoo infra team to complete that work.

Elogviewer – I’m maintaining the package, did code review for recent updates. I have a recent version bump to do at time of this writing.

Gentoolkit – Various python based modules, enalyze, equery, eclean, the new python based revdep-rebuild rewrite (some final debugging, fixes)

Catalyst – Gentoo Stage building tool, major re-write

A new small python based breakout lib for easy compression/decompression handling. It comes from my work in the catalyst rewrite, but could be useful in other tools. I have yet to create and name it as a standalone project.

12. What open source software can you not live without at home and at work?

dev-vcs/gitg, dev-util/geany, dev-vcs/git, Hexchat, xfce4 desktop environment,…

13. Which open source programs would you like to see developed?

gtk+:2 branch of gitg. It has gone to a gnome 3 look now which IMHO is yuk. It also lost the git blame feature currently in its re-write.

14. Age old question for Gentoo, how can we get more help?

Reducing the bikeshedding and name calling type attitudes present in some mail lists. Continue being an innovative leading Linux distribution building system.

15. Describe your desktop setup (WM/DE)?

Intel core-2 quad core based system with a shiny new SSD drive (Thank you Alec)
2 – 24 inch widescreen monitors
Basic xfce4 desktop, 14 virtual desktops, is a mix of Mac like toolbars and retro theme.
A hexchat window, toolbars, etc. in the left monitor, right monitor for main working apps windows, terminals

16. Tell us about your boxes and home network setup?

Not much to tell really. There’s my main desktop, an old 11 year old laptop, several printers. I have an old x86 box that I setup for a small server and router, but need to work on it. A hard drive failed on it due to a power failure. I have a 24 port gigabit switch. I still haven’t wired up this new house yet with lan everywhere. My wife and kids have some ipads, an Acer netbook.

17. What would be your dream job?

Working on some inventions, ideas I have for energy efficiency, earth friendly, and just plain cool ot fun :)

18. What gives you the most enjoyment within the Gentoo community?

Doing (hopefully) great coding work and having users really like what I’ve done to ease their work or save their system.
Mentoring students into doing better coding, being a more versatile developer.

19. What gives you the most enjoyment outside the Gentoo community?

Family

Help with samba-4 packages needed!

by Lars Wendler

Currently Gentoo’s samba team is severely understaffed. This has slowed down development of samba packages and its direct dependencies to a level where we cannot foresee when it is convenient to finally remove the mask on samba-4 and give it a wider range of testing from our users. There are a couple of automagic dependencies that need attention. Unfortunately samba upstream does very little to resolve these issues so we need people knowing the new build system of samba-4 to write patches for us. Furthermore samba-4 requires app-crypt/heimdal as kerberos provider which leads to packages blocking each other because they require app-crypt/mit-krb5 which cannot be installed together with heimdal.

This is a call for help getting as many blocker bugs from [1] fixed as possible. Once all these blockers are solved, unmasking samba-4 is the next logical step.

[1] https://bugs.gentoo.org/489762

Council News

This month the council addressed two issues brought up by the community.

In the aftermath of Heartbleed many are questioning the default configuration of packages like OpenSSH/OpenSSL, etc. If we had not enabled tls-heartbeat by default then Gentoo would have been immune to the recent troubles.

The council took up discussion, but felt that trying to make a one-size-fits-all policy wasn’t going to be practical. Maintainers were encouraged to follow upstream (which in the case of Heartbleed would have meant being vulnerable), but decisions are going to remain in the hands of individual maintainers. Specific issues can still be escalated to Council.

The other matter which came up concerned pkg-config files. Everybody can agree that upstream should be providing these when applicable, but there was disagreement over what should be done with upstream drops the ball. The crux of the argument was that not including them makes life more difficult for packages using the libraries on Gentoo, while including them can cause developers working on Gentoo to make assumptions that will cause problems on other distributions. The council decided that the current policy in the devmanual was not adequate and struck it down. In general maintainers will be given discretion to create pkg-config files not provided by upstream, but there will be guidelines around when this is done. The guidelines themselves need to be written, approved, and published to the devmanual.

Finally it was noted that election season is coming up, and the next Council meeting will be the last one of this term. Stay tuned for further details from the election team.

sys-power/upower update

>=sys-power/upower-0.99.0 has entered ~arch and has deprecated support for sys-power/pm-utils and hibernate/suspend in favor of using sys-apps/systemd.
If you suddenly notice that your favorite package no longer has capability for hibernate/suspend and you want them back, we have created a compatibility package sys-power/upower-pm-utils which will give you the old UPower back.
For example, Xfce 4.11+ has support for UPower 0.99 and it has copied the sys-power/pm-utils code from before UPower dropped it, and therefore hibernate/suspend should work with both versions, but this is likely untrue for most of the other packages.
Check out this forum post for more information.

Infrastructure News

Hosting sponsors needed
The Gentoo Infrastructure team is currently searching for hosting sponsors in Europe. We ask that sponsors contribute to Gentoo in one of two ways:

  1. A donation of at least two physical machines including space, power and 10Mbits of bandwidth (burstable to 50Mbit). This is the most common option that organizations prefer. Sponsors typically have existing dedicated space for their business and host hardware for Gentoo in that space.
  2. Donation of at least 12U space, 15A, and 10Mbits of bandwidth (burstable to 50Mbits).

In the latter case, the Gentoo Foundation can provide the server hardware (but not power, bandwidth, or rackspace / a rack.) In both cases we prefer the sponsor to provide remote hands for the machines.

Sponsors will received ads on ads.gentoo.org (the ad sidebar to the main site), postings on the sponsors page, as well as news items posted to www.gentoo.org.

Interested parties should contact infra@gentoo.org.

Sponsors often ask to host official Gentoo mirrors. Note that the Gentoo mirror network is not currently seeking new mirror sponsors at this time.
The gentoo infrastructure team has had significant operational problems with virtual machines and Gentoo Hardened. We see this as a pretty significant preference for physical hardware over solutions like Xen or VMWare.

Gentoo Developer Moves

Summary

Gentoo is made up of 236 active developers, of which 30 are currently away.
Gentoo has recruited a total of 798 developers since its inception.

Changes

The following developers have recently changed roles:

  • Jauhien Piatlicki joined the emacs, physics, science, mathematics and lxqt teams
  • Yury German joined the security team
  • Yixun Lan joined the proxy-maintainers, ARM and cjk teams
  • Peter Wilmott joined the ruby team
  • Julian Ospald joined the multilib and sound teams
  • Vlastimil Babka joined the kernel team
  • Michael Palimaka joined the lxqt team
  • Manuel Rueger joined the ARM team
  • Agostino Sarubbo left the KDE team
  • Brian Evans joined the MySQL team
  • Mikle Kolyada joined the embedded and dev-embedded teams.

Additions

The following developers have recently joined the project:

Moves

The following developers recently left the Gentoo project:
None this month

Portage

This section summarizes the current state of the portage tree.

Architectures 45
Categories 162
Packages 17471
Ebuilds 37518
Architecture Stable Testing Total % of Packages
alpha 3591 538 4129 23.63%
amd64 10762 6209 16971 97.14%
amd64-fbsd 0 1576 1576 9.02%
arm 2634 1722 4356 24.93%
arm64 436 30 466 2.67%
hppa 3051 488 3539 20.26%
ia64 3176 595 3771 21.58%
m68k 575 93 668 3.82%
mips 4 2379 2383 13.64%
ppc 6809 2388 9197 52.64%
ppc64 4313 876 5189 29.70%
s390 1460 332 1792 10.26%
sh 1656 402 2058 11.78%
sparc 4119 899 5018 28.72%
sparc-fbsd 0 319 319 1.83%
x86 11418 5259 16677 95.46%
x86-fbsd 0 3236 3236 18.52%

gmn-portage-stats-2014-06

Security

The following GLSAs have been released by the Security Team

GLSA Package Description Bug
201405-28 x11-wm/xmonad-contrib xmonad-contrib: Arbitrary code execution 478288
201405-27 dev-libs/libyaml LibYAML: Arbitrary code execution 505948
201405-26 net-misc/x2goserver X2Go Server: Privilege Escalation 497260
201405-25 dev-php/symfony Symfony: Information disclosure 444696
201405-24 dev-libs/apr Apache Portable Runtime, APR Utility Library: Denial of Service 339527
201405-23 media-libs/lib3ds lib3ds: User-assisted execution of arbitrary code 308033
201405-22 net-im/pidgin Pidgin: Multiple vulnerabilities 457580
201405-21 net-irc/charybdis Charybdis,ShadowIRCd: Denial of Service 449544
201405-20 media-libs/jbigkit JBIG-KIT: Denial of Service 507254
201405-19 app-crypt/mcrypt MCrypt: User-assisted execution of arbitrary code 434112
201405-18 net-misc/openconnect OpenConnect: User-assisted execution of arbitrary code 457068
201405-17 net-analyzer/munin Munin: Multiple vulnerabilities 412881
201405-16 dev-lang/mono Mono: Denial of Service 433768
201405-15 sys-apps/util-linux util-linux: Multiple vulnerabilities 359759
201405-14 dev-ruby/ruby-openid Ruby OpenID: Denial of Service 460156
201405-13 x11-libs/pango Pango: Multiple vulnerabilities 268976
201405-12 net-analyzer/ettercap Ettercap: Multiple vulnerabilities 340897
201405-11 app-backup/bacula Bacula: Information disclosure 434878
201405-10 dev-ruby/rack Rack: Multiple vulnerabilities 451620
201405-09 media-gfx/imagemagick ImageMagick: Multiple vulnerabilities 409431
201405-08 app-antivirus/clamav ClamAV: Multiple vulnerabilities 462278
201405-07 x11-base/xorg-server X.Org X Server: Multiple vulnerabilities 466222
201405-06 net-misc/openssh OpenSSH: Multiple vulnerabilities 231292
201405-05 net-misc/asterisk Asterisk: Denial of Service 504180
201405-04 www-plugins/adobe-flash Adobe Flash Player: Multiple vulnerabilities 501960
201405-03 net-irc/weechat WeeChat: Multiple vulnerabilities 442600
201405-02 net-libs/libsrtp libSRTP: Denial of Service 472302
201405-01 sys-fs/udisks udisks: Arbitrary code execution 504100

Package Removals/Additions

Removals

Package Developer Date
sci-geosciences/gempak pacho 03 May 2014
gnome-extra/evolution-kolab pacho 03 May 2014
www-apache/mod_ruby pacho 03 May 2014
x11-misc/suxpanel pacho 03 May 2014
kde-base/kdeartwork-sounds johu 09 May 2014
kde-base/kdnssd johu 09 May 2014
kde-base/kwallet johu 09 May 2014
games-puzzle/krosswordpuzzle johu 10 May 2014
app-portage/udept pacho 11 May 2014
media-libs/libj2k pacho 11 May 2014
media-gfx/cfe pacho 11 May 2014
media-gfx/yablex pacho 11 May 2014
app-admin/osiris pacho 11 May 2014
sys-power/cpufreqd pacho 11 May 2014
net-irc/ctrlproxy pacho 11 May 2014
x11-misc/pogo pacho 11 May 2014
sci-geosciences/openstreetmap-icons pacho 11 May 2014
dev-python/telepathy-python pacho 11 May 2014
media-tv/huludesktop pacho 11 May 2014
app-admin/lcap pacho 11 May 2014
www-apache/mod_chroot pacho 11 May 2014
dev-util/dissy pacho 11 May 2014
dev-libs/clens ulm 12 May 2014
dev-java/randomguid ulm 12 May 2014

Additions

Package Developer Date
net-wireless/openggsn zx2c4 01 May 2014
x11-misc/urxvt-font-size radhermit 02 May 2014
kde-misc/baloo-kcmadv dilfridge 02 May 2014
dev-ruby/dotenv-deployment graaff 03 May 2014
dev-java/headius-options tomwij 03 May 2014
gnome-extra/gnome-commander hwoarang 03 May 2014
mate-extra/caja-extensions tomwij 04 May 2014
media-gfx/eom tomwij 04 May 2014
x11-misc/mozo tomwij 04 May 2014
dev-ruby/descendants_tracker graaff 05 May 2014
gnome-extra/cinnamon-desktop tetromino 06 May 2014
gnome-extra/cinnamon-settings-daemon tetromino 06 May 2014
gnome-extra/cinnamon-session tetromino 06 May 2014
app-i18n/tagainijisho calchan 06 May 2014
dev-ruby/nio4r mrueg 07 May 2014
gnome-extra/cjs tetromino 07 May 2014
gnome-extra/cinnamon-menus tetromino 07 May 2014
app-crypt/paperkey mrueg 07 May 2014
dev-ruby/rinku mrueg 07 May 2014
gnome-extra/cinnamon-control-center tetromino 08 May 2014
net-wireless/cinnamon-bluetooth tetromino 08 May 2014
dev-python/aniso8601 radhermit 08 May 2014
dev-python/flask-restful radhermit 08 May 2014
dev-python/polib tetromino 09 May 2014
dev-db/soci jauhien 09 May 2014
dev-db/cppdb jauhien 09 May 2014
dev-python/sexpdata jauhien 10 May 2014
gnome-extra/cinnamon-screensaver tetromino 10 May 2014
sys-block/zram-init jauhien 10 May 2014
sci-chemistry/propka jlec 11 May 2014
dev-python/oslo-vmware vadimk 11 May 2014
sys-boot/winusb yac 11 May 2014
app-arch/xarchiver ssuominen 11 May 2014
dev-util/android-studio jauhien 11 May 2014
dev-ruby/fssm vikraman 11 May 2014
dev-ruby/compass vikraman 11 May 2014
dev-python/rax-scheduled-images-python-novaclient-ext prometheanfire 12 May 2014
dev-python/os-virtual-interfacesv2-python-novaclient-ext prometheanfire 12 May 2014
kde-misc/milou johu 12 May 2014
net-wireless/btcrack zerochaos 12 May 2014
dev-python/pymysql grknight 13 May 2014
app-arch/defluff tomwij 14 May 2014
sci-biology/update-blastdb jlec 14 May 2014
x11-misc/calise tomwij 14 May 2014
dev-ruby/pdf-core mrueg 15 May 2014
dev-ruby/priorityqueue mrueg 15 May 2014
dev-ruby/expression_parser mrueg 15 May 2014
dev-ruby/ae p8952 15 May 2014
dev-ruby/ansi p8952 15 May 2014
dev-ruby/brass p8952 15 May 2014
dev-ruby/facets p8952 15 May 2014
dev-ruby/lemon p8952 15 May 2014
dev-ruby/qed p8952 15 May 2014
dev-ruby/rubytest p8952 15 May 2014
dev-ruby/rubytest-cli p8952 15 May 2014
dev-ruby/hashery p8952 15 May 2014
gnome-extra/cinnamon-translations tetromino 16 May 2014
net-libs/balde rafaelmartins 18 May 2014
dev-lang/rust jauhien 18 May 2014
sci-libs/libgeodecomp slis 19 May 2014
dev-java/netty-common tomwij 19 May 2014
dev-java/netty-buffer tomwij 19 May 2014
dev-ruby/rrdtool-bindings graaff 19 May 2014
app-leechcraft/lc-eleeminator maksbotan 20 May 2014
app-backup/snapper dlan 21 May 2014
dev-java/netty-transport tomwij 21 May 2014
games-strategy/0ad-data hasufell 21 May 2014
games-strategy/0ad hasufell 21 May 2014
www-servers/hiawatha hasufell 22 May 2014
www-apps/hiawatha-monitor hasufell 22 May 2014
media-fonts/ahem idella4 23 May 2014
x11-misc/sddm jauhien 24 May 2014
lxqt-base/liblxqt jauhien 25 May 2014
net-misc/lxqt-openssh-askpass jauhien 25 May 2014
lxqt-base/lxqt-qtplugin jauhien 25 May 2014
app-vim/gitgutter radhermit 25 May 2014

Bugzilla

The Gentoo community uses Bugzilla to record and track bugs, notifications, suggestions and other interactions with the development team.

Activity

The following tables and charts summarize the activity on Bugzilla between 01 May 2014 and 31 May 2014. Not fixed means bugs that were resolved as NEEDINFO, WONTFIX, CANTFIX, INVALID or UPSTREAM.
gmn-activity-2014-05

Bug Activity Number
New 1388
Closed 977
Not fixed 259
Duplicates 158
Total 5734
Blocker 5
Critical 18
Major 66

Closed bug ranking

The following table outlines the teams and developers with the most bugs resolved during this period

Rank Team/Developer Bug Count
1 Gentoo Security 109
2 Gentoo Linux Gnome Desktop Team 44
3 Gentoo Games 31
4 Gentoo KDE team 29
5 Gentoo's Team for Core System packages 26
6 Multilib team 24
7 Gentoo X packagers 21
8 Qt Bug Alias 20
9 Retirement Admin 19
10 Others 653

gmn-closed-2014-05

Assigned bug ranking

The developers and teams who have been assigned the most bugs during this period are as follows.

Rank Team/Developer Bug Count
1 Gentoo Linux bug wranglers 158
2 Gentoo Linux Gnome Desktop Team 93
3 Gentoo Security 53
4 Gentoo KDE team 47
5 Multilib team 41
6 Python Gentoo Team 35
7 Gentoo's Team for Core System packages 35
8 Default Assignee for New Packages 25
9 Qt Bug Alias 24
10 Others 876

gmn-opened-2014-05

Tip of the month

Would you like to know why a particular package is masked?
You can create a simple shell function like this:

whymask() {
    find /usr/portage/profiles/ -name '*.mask' -exec \
        awk -vRS= "/${*/\//.}/ {
                print \" \" FILENAME \":\", \"\n\" \"\n\" \$0 \"\n\"
        }" {} + | less
}

You can do `whymask sys-kernel/gentoo-sources` to get reasons as to why
a particular package is masked; very handy to quickly check something
up, especially for USE flag masks which Portage doesn’t explain.

You can do `whymask Gnome 3.12` to get the entire GNOME 3.12 mask,
piping it to `grep -v mask: > /etc/portage/package.unmask/gnome3` then
allows you to quickly update your GNOME 3.12 unmask; if you want this to
happen on sync, you can put this line in /etc/portage/postsync.d/gnome3
and make it executable such that it’ll be ran after every sync.

The magic trick here is that awk -vRS= “/…/” matches paragraphs; as
the record separator is empty, it takes the blank lines.
by Tom Wijsman

Heard in the community

Send us your favorite Gentoo script or tip at gmn@gentoo.org

Getting Involved?

Interested in helping out? The GMN relies on volunteers and members of the community for content every month. If you are interested in writing for the GMN or thinking of another way to contribute, please send an e-mail to gmn@gentoo.org.

Comments or Suggestions?

Please head over to this forum post.

Alexys Jacob a.k.a. ultrabug (homepage, bugs)
uWSGI v2.0.5.1 (June 02, 2014, 14:12 UTC)

This release is important to me (and my company) as it officially introduces a few features we developed for our needs and then contributed to uWSGI.

Special congratulations to my co-worker @btall for his first contribution and for those nice features to the metrics subsystem with many thanks as usual to @unbit for reviewing and merging them so quickly.

new features

  • graceful reload of mule processes (Credits: Paul Egan) : SIGHUP is now sent to mules instead of directly killing them, by default you have 60 seconds to react before a SIGKILL
  • –metrics-no-cores, –stats-no-cores, –stats-no-metrics : don’t calculate and process all those core related metrics (gevent anyone ?)
  • reset_after_push for metrics (Credits: Babacar Tall) : this metric attribute ensures that the metric value is reset to 0 or its hardcoded initial_value every time the metric is pushed to some external system (like carbon, or statsd)
  • new metric_set_max and metric_set_min helpers (Credits: Babacar Tall) : can be used to avoid having to call “metric_get“ when you need a metric to be set at a maximal or minimal value. Another simple use case is to use the “avg“ collector to calculate an average between some *max* and *min* set metrics. Available in C and python.

See the full changelog here, especially some interesting bugfixes.

June 01, 2014
Jauhien Piatlicki a.k.a. jauhien (homepage, bugs)
LXQt 0.7.0 is available in the tree (June 01, 2014, 19:28 UTC)

07 May of 2014 version 0.7.0 of LXQt was released. LXQt is a new Qt-based desktop environment -- the successor of LXDE and Razor-qt. This is a first release since the moment the developing was started.

Why another DE could you ask? Well, as I've mentioned it is not really the new one. Even more, it is the result of merging of two existing projects. The reason for LXDE team to switch to the new project was quite understandable: LXDE is based on GTK-2, and it is going to be deprecated and unmaintained. For many reasons Qt seemed to be much better alternative than GTK-3, hence LXDE-Qt project was started. Then people from Razor-qt joined it. The 0.5.2 release of Razor-qt is going to be the last one, the development of LXDE will be continued for a while, but the main forces of both teams are concentrated on LXQt now.

Now, switching to the Gentoo. I have imported ebuilds for LXQt-0.7.0 into the tree recently and ask you to test them and file bugs ). There is a meta package lxqt-base/lxqt-meta with USEs for optional dependencies and minimal USE flag for the case if you do not like openbox and want other window manager.

As display manager LXQt team suggests using of LightDM or SDDM, both available in the tree. The last one has an issue: it does not have ConsoleKit support, so if you want, you are welcome to add it. Upstream seems to be not interested in it, so we need to handle this downstream.

For me LXQt worked perfectly, it seems to be quite stable and usable already. I have encountered only one issue that affects me: LXQt-panel still lacks autohiding. But it should be added in the next release.

Currently ebuilds in the tree are tested under amd64, arm and x86 architectures on GNU/Linux. Upstream claims a FreeBSD support, so you are welcome to try it there. May be you'll need live ebuilds from the qt overlay to do so.

If you want to help with LXQt maintaining, you are welcome, just join recently created lxqt herd.

At the end I would like to say thanks to Harvey Mittens, Davide Pesavento, Manuel Rüger and other people who helped with getting LXQt into the tree.

P.S. For those who for some strange reason came to this post on LJ and are wondering what is this all about: posts with gentoo tag are syndicated to the Gentoo Planet and I'll use it to make announcements and just write random gentoo-related thoughts.

Paweł Hajdan, Jr. a.k.a. phajdan.jr (homepage, bugs)

If you tried upgrading from stable amd64 to ~amd64 or otherwise done a big update of perl, you probably hit this weird perl-cleaner slot conflict:

# perl-cleaner --all
!!! Multiple package instances within a single package slot have been pulled
!!! into the dependency graph, resulting in a slot conflict:

dev-lang/perl:0

  (dev-lang/perl-5.18.2:0/5.18::gentoo, installed) pulled in by
    =dev-lang/perl-5.18* required by (virtual/perl-IO-1.280.0:0/0::gentoo, ebuild scheduled for merge)
    ^              ^^^^^                                                                                                                                  
    dev-lang/perl:0/5.18=[-build(-)] required by (perl-core/version-0.990.800:0/0::gentoo, installed)
                 ^^^^^^^^                                                                                                              
    (and 7 more with the same problems)

  (dev-lang/perl-5.16.3:0/5.16::gentoo, ebuild scheduled for merge) pulled in by
    =dev-lang/perl-5.16* required by (virtual/perl-Package-Constants-0.20.0-r3:0/0::gentoo, installed)
    ^              ^^^^^                                                                                                                                  
    (and 6 more with the same problem)


This is bug #506616, and the solution is to run the following command:

perl-cleaner --all -- --backtrack=30

Read more »

May 24, 2014
Anthony Basile a.k.a. blueness (homepage, bugs)
Lilblue Linux: release 20140520 (May 24, 2014, 22:35 UTC)

A couple of days ago, I pushed out a new build of Lilblue Linux [1] which is my attempt to turn embedded Linux on its head and use uClibc [2] instead of glibc as the standard C library for a fully featured XFCE4 desktop for amd64. Its userland is built with Gentoo’s hardened toolchain, and the image ships with a kernel built using hardened-sources which include the Grsec/PaX patches for added security, but its main distinguishing feature from mainstream Gentoo is uClibc. Even though Lilblue is something of an experimental project which grew out of my attempt to get more and more packages to build against uClibc, the system works better than I’d originally expected and there are very few glitches which are uClibc specific. You get pretty much everything you’d expect in a desktop, including all your multimedia goodies, office software, games and browsers. mplayer2 works flawlessly!

But all is not well in the land of uClibc these days. It has been over two years since the last release, 0.9.33.2 on May 15, 2012, and there are about 80 commits sitting in the 0.9.33 branch, many of which address critical issues since 0.9.33.2. This causes problems for people building around uClibc, such as buildroot, and there has even been talk on the email lists of dropping uClibc as its main libc in favor of either glibc or musl [3]. Buildroot is maintaining about 50 backported patches, while Mike’s (aka vapier’s) latest patchset has 20. I seem to always have to insert a backported patch of my own here or there, or ask Mike to include it in his patchset.

For this release, I did something that I have mixed feelings about. Instead of 0.9.33.2 + backported patches, I used the latest HEAD of the 0.9.33 git branch. This saved me the trouble of getting more patches backported into a new revision of our 0.9.33.2 ebuild, or by “cheating” and putting the patches into /etc/portage/patches/sys-libs/uclibc, but it did expose a well known problem in uClibc, namely the problem of how its header files stack. A libc’s header files typically include one another to form a stack [4]. For example, on glibc, sched.h stacks as follows

    sched.h
        features.h
            sys/cdefs.h
                features.h
                bits/wordsize.h
            gnu/stubs.h
        bits/types.h
            features.h
            bits/wordsize.h
            bits/typesizes.h
        stddef.h
        time.h
            features.h
            stddef.h
            bits/time.h
                bits/types.h
                bits/timex.h
                    bits/types.h
            bits/types.h
            xlocale.h
        bits/sched.h

Here sched.h includes features.h, bits/types.h, stddef.h, time.h and bits/sched.h. In turn, features.h includes sys/cdefs.h and gnu/stubs.h, and so on. Each indentation indicates another level of inclusion. Circular inclusions are avoided by using #ifdef shields.

At least one reason for this structure is to abstract away differences in architectures and ABIs in an effort to present a hopefully POSIX compliant interface to the rest of userland. So, for example, glibc’s sys/syscall.h looks the same on amd64 as on mipsel, but it includes asm/unistd.h which is different on the two architectures. Each architecture’s asm/unistd.h have their own internal #ifdefs for the different ABIs proper to the architecture, and each #ifdef section in turn defines the values of the various syscalls appropriately for their ABI [5]. Another reason for this stacked inclusion is to make sure that certain definitions, macros or prototypes defined in one header are made available in another header in the same way as they are made available in a c file. This is the reason given, for instance, in the uClibc commit 2e2dc998 which I examine below.

Let’s see where uClibc’s header problems begin. Take a look at Gentoo’s bug #486782, where cdrtools-3.01_alpha17 fails to build against uClibc because its readcd/readcd.c defines “BOOL clone;” which collides with the definition of clone() in bits/sched.h [6]. Nowhere is sched.h included in readcd.c, instead bits/sched.h gets pulled in indirectly because stdio.h is included! Comment 7 reveals the stacking problem. stdio.h’s stacking is complex, but following just the bad chain, we see that stdio.h includes bits/uClibc_stdio.h which includes bits/uClibc_mutex.h which includes pthread.h which includes sched.h which includes bits/sched.h — wheh! If you’re wondering what stdio.h should have to do with sched.h, then you see the problem: too much information is being exposed here. Joerg’s comment on the bug pretty much sums it up: “The related include files (starting from what stdio.h includes) most likely expose the problem because they seem to expose implementation details that do not belong to the scope of visibility of the using code.”

Back to my bump from 0.9.33.2 to the HEAD of the 0.9.33 branch. This bump unexpectedly exposed bugs #510766 and #510770. Here we find that =media-libs/nas-1.9.4 and =app-text/texlive-core-2012-r1, both of which build just fine against 0.9.33.2, fail against HEAD 0.9.33 because of a name collision with abs(). Unlike the case with cdrtools, where the blame is squarely on uClibc, I think this is a case of enough blame to go around. Both of those packages define abs() as a macro even though it is supposed to be a function prototyped in stdlib.h, as per POSIX.1-2001 [7]. At least nas tries to check if abs() has been already defined as a macro, but its still not enough of a check to avoid the name collision. Unfortunately, given its archaic imake system, its not as easy as just adding AC_CHECK_FUNCS([abs]) to configure.ac. texlive-core at least uses GNU autotools, but its collection of utilities define abs() in several different places making a fix messy. On the other hand, why do we suddenly have stdlib.h being pulled in after those macros with HEAD 0.9.33 whereas we didn’t with release 0.9.33.2? It turns out to be uClibc’s tiny commit 2e2dc998 which I quote here:

	sched.h: include stdlib.h for malloc/free
	Signed-off-by: Bernhard Reutner-Fischer <rep.dot.nop@gmail.com>

	diff --git a/libc/sysdeps/linux/common/bits/sched.h b/libc/sysdeps/linux/common/bits/sched.h
	index 7d6273f..878550d 100644
	--- a/libc/sysdeps/linux/common/bits/sched.h
	+++ b/libc/sysdeps/linux/common/bits/sched.h
	@@ -109,6 +109,7 @@ struct __sched_param
	 /* Size definition for CPU sets.  */
	 # define __CPU_SETSIZE	1024
	 # define __NCPUBITS	(8 * sizeof (__cpu_mask))
	+# include <stdlib.h>
	 
	 /* Type for array elements in 'cpu_set_t'.  */
	 typedef unsigned long int __cpu_mask;

Both packages pull in stdio.h after their macro definition of abs(). But now stdio.h, which pulls in bits/sched.h, further pulls in stdlib.h with the function prototype of abs() and … BOOM! … we get

/usr/include/stdlib.h:713:12: error: expected identifier or '(' before 'int'
/usr/include/stdlib.h:713:12: error: expected ')' before '>' token

Untangling the implementation details is a going to be a thorny problem. And, given uClibc’s faltering release schedule schedule, things are probably not going to get better soon. I have looked at the issue a bit, but not enough to start unraveling it. Its easier just to apply hacky patches to the odd package here and there than to rethink uClibc’s internal implementations. If we are going to start rethinking implementation, the musl [8] is much more exciting. uClibc is used in lots of embedded systems and the header issue is not going to be a show stopper for it or for Liblue, but it does make alternatives look like musl more attractive.

References:

[1] https://wiki.gentoo.org/wiki/Project:Hardened_uClibc/Lilblue

[2] http://www.uclibc.org

[3] See Petazzoni’s email to the uClibc community.

[4] I wrote a little python script to generate these stacks since creating them manually . You can download it from my dev space: header-stack.py. Note that the stacking is influenced by #ifdef’s throughout, eg #ifdef __USE_GNU, which the script ignores, but it does give a good starting place for how the stacking goes.

[5] As of glibc 2.17, on mips, asm/unistd.h defines the various __NR_* values in a flat file with three #ifdefs sections for _MIPS_SIM_ABI32, _MIPS_SIM_ABI64 and _MIPS_SIM_NABI32, respectively ABI=o32, n64 and n32. Using my script from [4], the stacking looks as follows:

    sys/syscall.h
        asm/unistd.h
            asm/sgidefs.h
        bits/syscall.h
            sgidefs.h

In contrast, on amd64, each ABI is broken out further into their own file, with asm/unistd_32.h, asm/unistd_x32.h or asm/unistd_64.h included into asm/unistd.h for __i386__, __ILP32__, or __ILP64__ respectively. Here the stacking is

    sys/syscall.h
        asm/unistd.h
            asm/unistd_32.h
            asm/unistd_x32.h
            asm/unistd_64.h
        bits/syscall.h

Remember, on both architectures, sys/syscall.h are identical, and that is the file you should include in your c programs, not any of the asm/* which often carry warnings not to include them directly.

[6] man 2 clone

[7] man 3 abs

[8] http://www.musl-libc.org/

May 23, 2014
Alexys Jacob a.k.a. ultrabug (homepage, bugs)
rsyslog v7.6.3 (May 23, 2014, 16:13 UTC)

This version bump was long overdue sorry and it has happened only thanks to the great work of Thomas D. aka @Whissi, thanks again mate.

Please read carefully because this version introduces major ebuild changes, you’ll probably have to adapt your current configuration !

ebuild changes

"/var/log/syslog" log file is now deprecated

   Beginning with rsyslog-7.6, the "/var/log/syslog" log file will no
   longer being written per default. We are considering this file as
   deprecated/obsolet for the typical user/system.
   The content from this log file is still availble through other
   (dedicated) log files, see

     - /var/log/cron.log
     - /var/log/daemon.log
     - /var/log/mail.log
     - /var/log/messages

   If you really need the old "/var/log/syslog" log file, all you have to
   do is uncommenting the corresponding configuration directive in
   "/etc/rsyslog.d/50-default.conf".

   If you do so, don't forget to re-enable log rotation in
   "/etc/logrotate.d/rsyslog", too.
  • An additional input socket in /var/empty/dev/log (default chroot
    location) will be created per default
  • brand new and modern init script

rsyslog-7.6.3

Coming from the rsyslog release announcement page, this is what happened with the 7.6 branch release :

With 7.6 being the successor of the 7.5 development branch, everything that has been added there has now found its way into the stable version.

The major additions consist of :
- imrelp/omrelp now support TLS & (zip) compression
- impstats is now emitting resource usage counters, can directly emit delta values and can now be bound to a ruleset
- mmpstrucdata is a new module to parse RFC5424 structured data into JSON message properties
- mmutf8fix is a new module to fix invalid UTF-8 sequences
- mmsequence is a new module that helps with action load balancing
- new defaults for main/ruleset queues to be more enterprise-like

Also the new stable version has undergone a lot of bug fixes, performance improvements and optimizations that make rsyslog 7.6 a lot more reliable and performing than before.

Anthony Basile a.k.a. blueness (homepage, bugs)

I hate being watched as much as the next person. Even the NSA loves its privacy otherwise it would be a transparent organization. What’s frightening and exciting about the technology we’re building today is that we are poised on a pivot point between extremes: deep invasion of our privacy and wide scale efforts to protect it. For those of you who don’t know the Tor Project [1] you really should look into it. Encrypted communication hides what you are saying from third party eavesdropping, but it does not hide who’s doing the talking, ie. it cannot hide the identity of one of the parties and so does not preserve your anonymity. If you decide to aim your browser at https://www.google.com/ then you can remain fairly certain that no one else is watching what you are googling for: you know, and google knows. But unfortunately, so does anyone google decides to tell! Given some of the exceptionally coercive methods governments use to make their demands [3], you might as well just announce your browsing habits publicly and be done with it.

Here’s where tor steps in. It doesn’t just encrypt your traffic, but also bounces it around the world via tor relays in such a way that even the nodes themselves can’t expose the origin of the traffic. Thus, tor provides its users with pretty good anonymity [4]. Now when google looks at its logs, it won’t see your ip address, but the ip address of one of the tor exit nodes. These are themselves publicly known [5], but the original ip from where the traffic is coming remains hidden. I’ve been using tor since about 2005. In July 2007, a tor operator in Germany [6] was arrested. Luckily his computers were not confiscated, but they could have been. The police wouldn’t have gotten much off of them, but there would have been the private keys and some other “evidence.” Running tor or any system of anonymity is not illegal, and it should never be illegal as it is in some countries, but today the line between what is legal and what powers governments will abuse has been blurred if not erased entirely. 2007 was also about the time the cloud computing was catching on, so I got the idea of creating a micro Linux distribution whose only purpose was to house a tor relay in an environment that maximizes security and privacy. The image boots from an ISO into ram, any keys or configs are scp-ed in, and upon power down … poof! … nothing to see here, move along. This was also about the time that I was getting involved with hardened Gentoo development and I met up with Magnus Granberg (zorry) who was working on migrating toolchain hardening from gcc-3 to gcc-4. I was teaching a course on embedded Linux, primarily building systems with uClibc and buildroot, and so tor-ramdisk was born [7]. I originally targeted only i686, but later added amd64 and mips32r2 for router boards like the Mikrotik RB450G.

So what goes into tor-ramdisk? You can read the build scripts [8] for details, but basically the kernel is Gentoo’s hardened-sources kernel with PaX and Grsec turned on full force. A minimal userland is provided by a crippled busybox with most of its applets turned off. You need openssl for tor itself as well as openssh which provides for scp-ing keys and config files in and out of the image. Tor critically depends on the time being right, so I used openntpd for synchronization. You also need a good source of entropy for key generation and encryption, which is always a problem on embedded systems [9], so haveged is used shore up the kernel’s /dev/random. Finally we need uClibc and libevent. I cheat a little and build on uClibc virtual machines, so I can just copy over the needed libraries rather than cross compiling them. Everything is built using Gentoo’s hardened toolchains and so all the ELFs binaries have SSP, PIE + ASLR, relro, bind_now and other security goodies [10]. For i686 and amd64, kernel and userland are bundled up in a bootable ISO image, while for mips I embed the initramfs in the bootlable Linux image which can be delivered via tftp. When the system boots, the user is presented with a menu driven system on tty1 to configure and start tor. The menu is a shell script spawned by init as “tty1::respawn:/bin/setup”. On tty2, tty3 amd tty3 we have, respectively, the output of nmeter (ascii based system usage meter provided by busybox), ntpd and haveged.

I don’t know why I haven’t blogged about tor-ramdisk before on Planet Gentoo, but it is a Gentoo “derivative.” It is also popular project, at least according to freecode.com. The i686 image is the most popular, followed by the amd64, with several hundred downloads per release. I’ve stopped producing the mips32r2 image because no one was using it, even though it was the most fun to build! There have been suggestions for new features but I’ve tended to resist because I like the ~6 MB image. If you can think of something I can add without growing that image much, send patches my way!

 

 

References:

[1] https://www.torproject.org/. The Gentoo package is net-misc/tor.

[2] “fairly certain” but not 100% certain as we recently learned from CVE-2014-0160, aka the “heartbleed” bug. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heartbleed

[3] You can read the story of lavabit’s owner as told by him at http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/may/20/why-did-lavabit-shut-down-snowden-email

[4] There are attacks against tor so it isn’t perfect, but it is by far the best anonymity software out there. See the wiki page on tor for its weaknesses: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tor_(anonymity_network)

[5] There are various lists of exit and relay nodes. For a live list, check out http://torstatus.blutmagie.de/

[6] http://www.cnet.com/news/tor-anonymity-server-admin-arrested/

[7] The main development site is http://opensource.dyc.edu/tor-ramdisk. I announce releases at https://freecode.com/projects/tor-ramdisk.

[8] https://gitweb.torproject.org/tor-ramdisk.git

[9] See Josh Ayers’ email to the tor-ramdisk list http://opensource.dyc.edu/pipermail/tor-ramdisk/2014-February/000119.html.

[10] You can read a little bit about these hardening techniques from the “Project Description” of a related project, Lilblue Linux: https://wiki.gentoo.org/wiki/Project:Hardened_uClibc/Lilblue

 

May 20, 2014
Michael Palimaka a.k.a. kensington (homepage, bugs)
Plasma Next on Gentoo (May 20, 2014, 18:12 UTC)

As you may have heard, the KDE release structure is evolving. The process is already well under way, with the second beta of the reusable KDE frameworks and first beta of the next-generation Plasma workspace already released.

Please note that while usable, Plasma Next is definitely not yet ready for production. For the adventurous, everything needed can be found in the KDE overlay.

If you do decide to try it out, feel free to file bugs, send pull requests, or just drop us a line on mail/irc with your feedback. It’s definitely appreciated, and numerous improvements have already been made thanks to efforts of our users.

Otherwise, enjoy the screenshot and stay tuned for the next release.

plasma-next

May 14, 2014
Alexys Jacob a.k.a. ultrabug (homepage, bugs)
mongoDB v2.6.1 (May 14, 2014, 09:17 UTC)

This is a great pleasure to announce the version bump of mongoDB to the brand new v2.6 stable branch !

This bump is not trivial and comes with a lot of changes, please read carefully as you will have to modify your mongodb configuration files !

ebuild changes

As a long time request and to be more in line with upstream’s recommendations (and systemd support) I moved the configuration of the mongoDB daemons to /etc so make sure to adapt to the new YAML format.

  • the mongodb configuration moved from /etc/conf.d/mongodb to the new YAML formatted /etc/mongodb.conf
  • the mongos configuration moved from /etc/conf.d/mongos to the new YAML formatted /etc/mongos.conf
  • the MMS agent configuration file has moved to /etc/mms-agent.conf

The init scripts also have been taken care of :

  • new and modern mongodb, mongos and mms-agent init scripts
  • their /etc/conf.d/ configuration files are only used to modify the init script’s behavior

highlights

The changelog is long and the goal of this post is not to give you an already well covered topic on the release notes but here are my favorite features :

  • MongoDB preserves the order of the document fields following write operations.
  • A new write protocol integrates write operations with write concerns. The protocol also provides improved support for bulk operations.
  • MongoDB can now use index intersection to fulfill queries supported by more than one index.
  • Index Filters to limit which indexes can become the winning plan for a query.
  • Background index build allowed on secondaries.
  • New cleanupOrphaned command to remove orphaned documents from a shard.
  • usePowerOf2Sizes is now the default allocation strategy for all new collections.
  • Removed upward limit of 20 000 connections for the maxIncomingConnections for mongod and mongos.
  • New cursor.maxTimeMS() and corresponding maxTimeMS option for commands to specify a time limit.

Make sure you follow the official upgrade plan to upgrade from a previous version, this release is not a simple drop-in replacement.

thanks

Special thanks go to Johan Bergström for his continuous efforts and responsiveness as well as Mike Limansky and Jason A. Donenfeld.

May 12, 2014
Luca Barbato a.k.a. lu_zero (homepage, bugs)
Libav 10.1 released (in Gentoo) (May 12, 2014, 22:08 UTC)

I just committed the ebuild in Portage and noticed that Homebrew already updated its Formula.

I spent some time in Berlin at LinuxTAG manning the VideoLAN booth and feeding people with VLC and Libav chocolate (many thanks to Borgodoro for providing me with their fine goods).

During the weekend we held the VideoLAN association meeting in the SoundCloud office, thanks a lot again for the wonderful venue.

Unmask in Gentoo

I’m slowly getting a tinderbox up with the help of Flameeyes so we can make sure nothing unexpected happens, the new refcounted API for Frames and Packets makes quite compelling updating from 9 even if we’ll keep updating both release branches for the next year and half.

You can help

There are a number of packets that depend on old 0.8 ffmpeg application and it won’t really work with the current avconv nor with the ffmpeg provided by the recent versions since the new option parsing code written by Anton ended up there as well. Most of those application are either fully orphaned or they have patches to work with avconv because the Debian and Ubuntu developers took care of it. Nikoli provided me with a list.

HWAccel 1.2

This week-end I eventually merged hwaccel1.2 and I hope to get the AVResample updates finalized by this week.

There had been some discussion regarding backporting the latter to release 10 since they simplify a bit porting to the new resampling library.

Rotation reporting API

Vittorio was working on a mean to export the rotation matrix from MOV and SEI NALs since a while. The devil is usually in the details and I guess it had been an hell of fun for him. Even more since he switched continent meanwhile.

After the Linus rant about not having the automagic support for rotation, we had some decent pressure applied to get it out so people will be able to enjoy it. Hopefully it will appear by the week end as well.

Sven Vermeulen a.k.a. swift (homepage, bugs)
Revamped our SELinux documentation (May 12, 2014, 20:15 UTC)

In the move to the Gentoo wiki, I have updated and revamped most of our SELinux documentation. The end result can be seen through the main SELinux page. Most of the content is below this page (as subpages).

We start with a new introduction to SELinux article which goes over a large set of SELinux’ features and concepts. Next, we cover the various concepts within SELinux. This is mostly SELinux features but explained more in-depth. Then we go on to the user guides. We start of course with the installation of SELinux on Gentoo and then cover the remainder of administrative topics within SELinux (user management, handling AVC denials, label management, booleans, etc.)

The above is most likely sufficient for the majority of SELinux users. A few more expert-specific documents are provided as well (some of them still work in progress, but I didn’t want to wait to get some feedback) and there is also a section specific for (Gentoo) developers.

Give it a review and tell me what you think.

May 09, 2014
Sven Vermeulen a.k.a. swift (homepage, bugs)
Dropping sesandbox support (May 09, 2014, 19:03 UTC)

A vulnerability in seunshare, part of policycoreutils, came to light recently (through bug 509896). The issue is within libcap-ng actually, but the specific situation in which the vulnerability can be exploited is only available in seunshare.

Now, seunshare is not built by default on Gentoo. You need to define USE="sesandbox", which I implemented as an optional build because I see no need for the seunshare command and the SELinux sandbox (sesandbox) support. Upstream (Fedora/RedHat) calls it sandbox, which Gentoo translates to sesandbox as it collides with the Gentoo sandbox support otherwise. But I digress.

The build of the SELinux sandbox support is optional, mostly because we do not have a direct reason to support it. There are no Gentoo users that I’m aware of that use it. It is used to start an application in a chroot-like environment, based on Linux namespaces and a specific SELinux policy called sandbox_t. The idea isn’t that bad, but I rather focus on proper application confinement and full system enforcement support (rather than specific services). The SELinux sandbox makes a bit more sense when the system supports unconfined domains (and users are in the unconfined_t domain), but Gentoo focuses on strict policy support.

Anyway, this isn’t the first vulnerability in seunshare. In 2011, another privilege escalation vulnerability was found in the application (see bug 374897).

But having a vulnerability in the application (or its interaction with libcap-ng) doesn’t mean an exploitable vulnerability. Most users will not even have seunshare, and those that do have it will not be able to call it if you are running with SELinux in strict or have USE="-unconfined" set for the other policies. If USE="unconfined" is set and you run mcs, targeted or mls (which isn’t default either, the default is strict) then if your users are still mapped to the regular user domains (user_t, staff_t or even sysadm_t) then seunshare doesn’t work as the SELinux policy prevents its behavior before the vulnerability is triggered.

Assuming you do have a targeted policy with users mapped to unconfined_t and you have built policycoreutils with USE="sesandbox" or you run in SELinux in permissive mode, then please tell me if you can trigger the exploit. On my systems, seunshare fails with the message that it can’t drop its privileges and thus exits (instead of executing the exploit code as it suggested by the reports).

Since I mentioned that most user don’t use SELinux sandbox, and because I can’t even get it to work (regardless of the vulnerability), I decided to drop support for it from the builds. That also allows me to more quickly introduce the new userspace utilities as I don’t need to refactor the code to switch from sandbox to sesandbox anymore.

So, policycoreutils-2.2.5-r4 and policycoreutils-2.3_rc1-r1 are now available which do not build seunshare anymore. And now I can focus on providing the full 2.3 userspace that has been announced today.

May 06, 2014
Denis Dupeyron a.k.a. calchan (homepage, bugs)
Tagaini Jisho (May 06, 2014, 18:30 UTC)

I haven’t been using Tagaini Jisho for long, but so far I’m impressed. Tagaini Jisho is a kanji dictionary and study tool. Here’s what the author has to say about it:

Tagaini Jisho is a free, open-source Japanese dictionary and kanji lookup tool that is available for Windows, MacOS X and Linux and aims at becoming your Japanese study assistant. It allows you to quickly search for entries and mark those that you wish to study, along with tags and personal notes. It also let you train entries you are studying and follows your progression in remembering them. Finally, it makes it easy to review entries you did not remember by listing them on screen or printing them on a small booklet.

Tagaini Jisho also features complete stroke order animations for more than 6000 kanji.

You can find the author’s website at http://www.tagaini.net/.

I have pushed version 1.0.2 to the tree. Note that there is a version of sqlite which is bundled with the source tarball. I tried to unbundle it but it wasn’t trivial (to me, at least), so I left it there for the time being. If you figure out how to properly unbundle sqlite, feel free to commit the changes yourself. As usual with my packages, don’t waste time asking if you can do it, just do it.

Alexys Jacob a.k.a. ultrabug (homepage, bugs)
uWSGI v2.0.4 (May 06, 2014, 07:58 UTC)

Quick post for an interesting version bump of uWSGI which brings an experimental loopengine for python3.4 asyncio (aka tulip) !

If you want to try it out, I added a python_asyncio USE flag. I’ve also made some cleanups on the ebuild wrt python versions and dropped older versions of uWSGI.

highlights

  • experimental asyncio loop engine (python 3.4 only)
  • httprouter advanced timeout management
  • purge LRU cache (v2) feature
  • allow duplicate headers in http parsers
  • faster on_demand Emperor management
  • fixed segfault for unnamed loggers

See the full changelog here.

May 04, 2014
Andreas K. Hüttel a.k.a. dilfridge (homepage, bugs)
KDE forums and Baloo discussion (May 04, 2014, 17:49 UTC)

In a recent blog post, I have criticized the events around the inclusion of Baloo in KDE 4.13.0. Since then, I have removed the blog post again, since a nice person convinced me it would not bring any good.

I would like to clarify two things.

First, I do not know of any forum threads that were locked in connection with this discussion or recent events, and I do not know of any similar, related actions on the KDE Forums. While I haven't directly stated this, I may have incorrectly insinuated that such an action took place, and for this I would like to offer my sincere apologies to the KDE Forums team.

Second, my post was interpreted the way that dissenting material had been removed in the KDE Forums. This was never my intention, and such an idea never even crossed my mind until I received feedback. I trust the integrity of the KDE Forum administrators and sincerely believe that such an action never happened and will never happen. I am sorry if you got a different impression from my words.

Please let us now get back to making KDE the best desktop environment ever.

Alexys Jacob a.k.a. ultrabug (homepage, bugs)
After vacation bug hunting (May 04, 2014, 16:53 UTC)

Two weeks vacations always seem short yet the 900+ mails waiting for sorting on my Gentoo Linux inbox was a reminder that our beloved distribution is well alive ! So I guess it was time for a little bug killing spree :)

rabbitMQ v3.3.0

This release improves performance in a variety of conditions, adds monitoring information to identify performance bottlenecks, adds dynamically manageable shovels, and allows Java-based clients to reconnect automatically after network failure.

This release also corrects a number of defects in the broker and plugins, as well as introducing a host of smaller features as you can see on the changelog. Be warned that the behavior of the guest user has been altered !

I also fixed a long awaiting bug to bump the rabbitMQ C client to v0.5.0

redis v2.8.9

Johan Bergström is as always doing a great and helpful job and is actively working on redis, thanks mate !

  • [NEW] The HyperLogLog data structure. You can read more about it  in this blog post
  • [NEW] The Sorted Set data type has now support for lexicographic range queries, check the new commands ZRANGEBYLEX, ZLEXCOUNT and ZREMRANGEBYLEX, which are documented at http://redis.io

py3status v1.5

  • fixes installation via pip
  • added a –version command line argument to get the currently installed version of py3status

upcoming bumps

You might be interested in what’s next on the todo list :

  • With the help of Thomas D. aka @Whissi, we’re working on bumping and enhancing rsyslog to v7.6.3. For this a series of its dependencies have been bumped today as well.
  • mongoDB v2.6.0 is also on track, as usual the guys @mongodb have broken the scons building so it’s taking more time than it should to fix this hell (all help appreciated).

May 03, 2014
Patrick Lauer a.k.a. bonsaikitten (homepage, bugs)

KDE 4.13 was released with a new indexer, named "Baloo". It mostly replaces the 'old' Akonadi indexer, which at first glance appears to be a good idea. It seems to work, so that's quite swell. There's only a problem. Or rather, some little problems, and upstream is one of them as they don't want to acknowledge that these issues exist. So let me try to explain ...

  • There are times when I just need the indexer to not run. For example when I'm watching a movie (IO activity -> stutter), doing a presentation (random lag?!) etc. And there are times (e.g. at night) when the indexer can run as much as it wants.
  • There are times when the indexer interferes with normal operation - e.g. when using firefox, the added IO activity causes the FF UI to lag severely, as if the machine was swapping. Partially also because the IO activity evacuates the filesystem cache, which is quite funny. And fsync plus lots of reads means the latency goes up to multiple seconds or even multiple tens of seconds for a single IO activity
  • The indexer claims to not interfere with normal operation. It limits itself to 10% CPU usage - which is the wrong metric, since I have lots of CPU and very little IO, relatively speaking. Thus it takes 100% of available IO bandwidth. Akonadi used up to 4 CPUs for longer amounts of time, but as it didn't hurt IO much I could just ignore it.
  • The indexer takes a LONG time. On boot it needs about 20 minutes walltime just to figure out if anything has changed. During that time service quality is severely degraded.
  • The indexer takes a long time. The initial scan of my home directory takes about, hmm, 36-48h I think, during which time service quality is severely degraded
  • The indexer isn't polite, it auto-respawns if you just kill the baloo_file_indexer process. You have to kill its parent too, otherwise it'll just respawn and bother you some more
  • [Fixed in next release] Removing a directory from the index causes an index cleaner to run, which is even more severe than the indexer itself
So, to summarize: As much as I like the indexer, it prevents me from working normally, so I have to insist that it has a simple "off" button. A lesson that akonadi learned, that gnome's tracker learned, is that you need to nice yourself down. It would be very much appreciated if baloo were to nice and ionice itself down to idle, which usually avoids the severe lag that foreground tasks may experience.

An extra bonus would be this: The indexer should do a microbenchmark on startup (or let the user provide a guesstimate) to figure out IO capacity in IO/s, and then limit itself to a configurable amount of that. If it takes 1/10th of my IO bandwidth (about 10-15 IO/s with a single SATA disk) it wouldn't even bother me more than, say, Firefox running in the background.

Another interesting glitch is that most indexers use inotify listeners to see if anything in a directory changes. This has the funny effect that it only works on small data sets - on my desktop I get random popups that an application wants to change system limits. Well, /proc/sys/fs/inotify/max_user_watches is already set to "262144" by default, and that's still not enough? This also takes memory, and it can't scale up. I "only" have a few million files, that's not even a lot.

So, to summarize:
Simple fixes:
  • Nice and ionice the indexer on startup
  • Provide users with a simple on/off mechanism
Advanced fixes:
  • Throttle on IO instead of CPU
  • Delay indexer startup for a little while on boot. Maybe 120sec grace period
  • Figure out system limits and fail gracefully instead of annoying users with popups
Well, dear upstream, don't accuse me of not being constructive ...
<DrEeevil> people complain about user-hostile behaviour, and you tell them to ... be nicer and not complain so loud?
<unormal> DrEeevil: To be honest. The only things I see from you in here since hours and days is hostile behaviour. I really would like to ask you to stop this and be constructive or otherwise leave <DrEeevil> unormal: well, if I didn't have to remove binaries and kill processes I'd be a lot happier
<DrEeevil> since upstream hasn't shown any understanding I'll rather escalate until the bugs are resolved
<DrEeevil> constructive: give me an off button so I can stop the indexer when it hurts me, give me a rate limit so I can run it while using the computer
<DrEeevil> (using 99% of available IO bandwidth for up to 72h is just not acceptable in normal use)
<DrEeevil> I don't want to remove the indexer, but I want to control how much resource usage it has
<DrEeevil> (bonus: ionice + nice it down to lowest/idle, then it doesn't bother that much)
<DrEeevil> it's not THAT hard to figure that out ...
<unormal> DrEeevil: Ok and now explicitely: Please do us a favor and leave the channel.
<DrEeevil> unormal: once I can have baloo installed and working as described above you'll never hear from me again
<DrEeevil> just every time I get a local DoS you get a complaint, so that you don't lose the motivation to fix the bugs
<unormal> That's not how you motivate people, please leave.
<DrEeevil> that's not how you write software, please fix
<DrEeevil> I'll be the stone in your shoe until you stop being the one in mine
<DrEeevil> heck, I'll even test patches once they are provided!
<krop> and ultimately, you'll roll on the floor crying until something happens ? how can gentoo accept immature people in their staff ?
--> seaLne (~seaLne@kde/kenny) has joined #kde-baloo
*** Mode #kde-baloo +o seaLne by ChanServ
<DrEeevil> krop: how can kde have releases with such serious regressions?
<DrEeevil> sorry, I don't deal with C++, in this case I'm just a QA tool
<krop> no, you just behave like a stubborn child
<DrEeevil> because I actually would like to USE kde
<DrEeevil> not sure how you see that, but it's kinda nice usually, except when someone staples in a DoS and then tells me that's all fine and dandy
<DrEeevil> maybe I should use git HEAD again to catch regressions earlier
*** Mode #kde-baloo +b DrEeevil!*@* by seaLne
*** Mode #kde-baloo +b not!*@* by seaLne
*** Mode #kde-baloo +b being!*@* by seaLne
*** Mode #kde-baloo +b constructive!*@* by seaLne
<DrEeevil> heh
<-* seaLne has kicked DrEeevil from #kde-baloo (DrEeevil)

May 02, 2014
Andreas K. Hüttel a.k.a. dilfridge (homepage, bugs)

KDE 4.13.0 has arrived for users of all distributions by now, and with it the new Baloo indexer. It may be well a fine-working piece of software for many use cases. However, it seems also many people have trouble with it, including myself. Let us google "baloo indexer". This is what I get as first search results (I'm dropping 2 related entries that clearly refer to a KDE Beta or RC):


  1. [kubuntu] How to disable baloo indexer - Ubuntu Forums

    ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2217434
    Apr 23, 2014 - 8 posts - ‎5 authors
    After the update to 14.04 Kubuntu I did notice an executable running constantly using up to 95% of my CPU time that I had never noticed before ...
  2. How to turn off baloo in KDE 4.13? - Ask Ubuntu

    askubuntu.com/questions/437635/how-to-turn-off-baloo-in-kde-4-13
    ... just installed the newest updates. Looking at the process list I see baloo indexer running. I could not find a checkbox in Baloo settings to turn off the indexing.
  3. Gentoo Forums :: View topic - KDE 4.13: How to disable baloo file ...

    https://forums.gentoo.org/viewtopic-t-986946.html?sid...
    Mar 22, 2014 - 25 posts - ‎12 authors
    So KDE 4.13 is looming, and it'll bring a new indexer 'baloo' while 'nepomuk'/'strigi' is still in the process of being phased out apparently.

  4. [SOLVED] KDE screw up: baloo-file indexer - how to shut it down ...

    https://www.kubuntuforums.net/showthread.php?...baloo...indexer...
    Apr 22, 2014 - 10 posts - ‎4 authors
    Just updated my last box - my main one - to KB 14.04. As I'm adjusting various things, I notice that something is seriously devouring CPU cycles ...
  5. KDE 4.13 Baloo sucking system resources. (Page 1) / Applications ...

    bbs.archlinux.org › ... › KDE 4.13 Baloo sucking system resources.
    Apr 19, 2014 - 25 posts - ‎13 authors
    Baloo only indexes files in /home/$user and doesn't not index any removable device by default. So that trick says to don't index anything.
The list goes on, including Kubuntu, Gentoo, Arch, and OpenSuSE users at least. Now, totally independent of the actual software details, this is for KDE a complete public relations disaster which no promotional press release can cure. Even if many many bugs are fixed until the next released version, the aftertaste will remain for a long time. [1]

Let's try to figure out what went wrong.

No software will ever be perfect, especially not in a first version. And most users are perfectly willing to try out something new and accept that it may be buggy in the beginning. (Seriously, why else would you run a KDE 4.X.0 release? :D [2,3]) However, they appreciate if this is a deliberate, and informed decision on their part, and if things go wrong they want to be able to switch them off.

What options are there to disable Baloo indexing?
  • The recommended one for files - add the home directory to the exclude list.
    Fairly unintuitive. Direct opposite of previous Nepomuk behaviour. Does not affect e-mail indexing. Only mentioned in "outside" documentation. In 4.13.0, if you dont do it immediately the resulting database cleaner process will pull your system down worse than the indexer ever did. (This is fixed in 4.13.1, I think.)
  • Do not install the Baloo package if your distribution allows that [4].
    Not an option for multi-user systems. Hey, maybe someone wants to try the cool new features and doesn't have a >100G home directory.
  • killall, sudo chmod, sudo rm, or fiddling in configuration files.
    What, seriously?
Here's the fairly official statement on why the Enable/Disable button is gone:
There is no explicit “Enable/Disable” button any more. We would like to promote the use of searching and feel that Baloo should never get in the users way. However, we are smart about it and IF you add your HOME directory to the list of “excluded folders”, Baloo will switch itself off since it no longer has anything to index.
OK, something about this statement is incongruent with reality. Found it? Right, the part about getting in the way. But please, this is a .0 release, so it's completely natural that the software can be buggy, and this was already foreseeable during RC and Beta releases. No problem, and we're happy to help getting the bugs fixed. However, this makes the decision to deliberately omit the big, clearly marked "OFF" button, hmm, slightly provocative. Maybe it would have been better to leave the button in for a while and get a bit less testing feedback in exchange.

Well, feedback. It is coming, as you can see all from the Google results. The response seems to be clearly divided into two groups. The large-number, loud one is the protesting users; many of them are getting angry, some get abusive. We're not talking about a few corner cases here. This went so far that on the kde-devel mailing list emergency moderation was turned on, and criticizing how the situation is handled seems to be the best way to get the KDE Community Code of Conduct cited to you by the second group, especially the "Be respectful" paragraph. However... switching the mailing list to moderated, kicking people from irc channels, or locking forum threads doesn't really solve any problem, and barely masks anything, it just helps you keep your personal bubble quiet. The unwanted side effect is to increase the general sense of frustration and shift annoyance and/or protest to other channels. Note that none of the links above is a KDE website? It's all distribution pages. Google finds them anyway.

Finally, what seems to be quietly dropped is that the KDE Community Code of Conduct contains two large sections "Be considerate" and "Be pragmatic". Quoting the former,
Your actions and work will affect and be used by other people and you in turn will depend on the work and actions of others. Any decision you take will affect other community members, and we expect you to take those consequences into account when making decisions.
In some other forum the question was asked, "Can you imagine a non-technical user wanting to temporarily disabling indexing?" I don't really have to imagine these users. They are pretty hard to miss, and they are people using baloo and being affected by its code. Please try to be aware that placing attitude over simple functionality add-ons hurts KDE as a whole.

So, how about a simple, immediately-acting, easy-to-find "off" button? Better late than never... and maybe backportable to 4.13.0? Or maybe, if that has already happened [5] and I only completely missed it, a clear statement of "We heard you"?



[1] No, rebranding to Rikki-Tikki-Tavi Community Edition won't help either.
[2] To be honest, the last .0 releases (4.10.0, 4.11.0, 4.12.0) were very unproblematic and smooth; that came as a pleasant surprise.
[3] Of course, not all the bugfixing in a new 4.X.Y release takes place upstream in the KDE git repositories. Having many willing users test 4.X.0 also leads to downstream fixes, be it packaging problems, reverts, or backports.
[4] Gentoo allows for an installation without any desktop search features, by disabling the semantic-desktop use flag. However, part of the relevant library code is, e.g., hard-required by kdepim (kmail, kontact, ...), which is why these programs require semantic-desktop to be switched on.
[5] Yes I know about the alternative configuration module by Lindsay Mathieson, I'm just testing it, and from the user interface I like it. I'll bring up in our next team meeting to have that installed as default. In the end, that's however just the distros doing the work for you... (and while users might be happier, everyone "upstream" will only rant about that impossible Gentoo again).

May 01, 2014
Gentoo Monthly Newsletter: April 2014 (May 01, 2014, 22:20 UTC)

Gentoo News

Interview with Chris Reffett (creffett)

1. Hi Chris, tell us about yourself.
I’m a Computer Science student studying at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, USA, and I’m currently finishing my junior year. In my free time I read science fiction and play video games. I’m also a member of the student-run computing club and Linux user group on campus.

2. Bring us back to your start with electronics and computers.
Not all that much to say here; I’ve been playing with (and breaking) computers since I was about three years old. As my parents can attest, I managed to mess up my first computer within a few days of getting access to it, to the point of needing a complete reinstall.

3. How did you get involved with open source, and what path did you take to become a Gentoo developer?
I became involved in open source in high school; the school had a student-run Linux computer lab, and I joined the team in my second year. We used Gentoo heavily in the lab, and I ended up getting a lot of experience maintaining it there (and installing it—I made a point of grabbing any old odd-architecture hardware that came through the lab and putting Gentoo on it). I filed a few bugs and wrote a few in-lab ebuilds during my time there, but nothing too major.
Once I left and went to college, I decided I wanted to start actually contributing to Gentoo. The recruiters suggested a few different ways to contribute, and I ended up working with the KDE team, which put me on the road to becoming a dev.

4. Hows your programming skills and are they important in becoming a developer?
My programming skills aren’t anything special, enough to get through my classes and all that. I would say that the average developer needs to know enough programming to decipher error messages, do basic bash scripting, and understand how to read most code (to find and fix basic errors in packages). Entry-level knowledge, you don’t have to be a coding wizard.

5. Tell us about your mentor and the process to become a developer?
My mentor was tampakrap, the KDE team lead at the time, who has since ventured forth into the forbidden realms of the Infra team. After I had been contributing to the KDE team on bugzilla for a couple months, he asked if I was being recruited yet, and then if I wanted to become a dev. After that, I spent some time contributing to the KDE team repo, and was assigned tommy as my recruiter.

6. How can Gentoo improve?
One aspect of Gentoo that I think is both one of our biggest strengths and weaknesses is the very independent-minded culture among our developers. While this is not in itself a bad thing, it leads to a lot of instances where people refuse to cooperate or communicate, get very territorial about their packages, flamewars on gentoo-dev@, and so on. I think the project as a whole would be improved if developers were a little more civil and cooperative and a little less quick to shout at each other.

7. Tell us about some of the projects you are involved in.
I started out as a KDE team member, and am still a member (though recently I’m a lot less active there than I should be). Also, I am currently the sole developer in the theology team, though that isn’t so bad since it’s a small set of packages and the release schedules are pretty slow. I’m also one of the more recent inductees to the Security project (along with Pinkbyte and zlogene), a GLEP editor, and of course, I am a member of the QA team.

8. The QA project just made a overhaul, what does the project do, who is involved, where would you like to see it in 3 years?
The purpose of the Quality Assurance project is to help maintain consistency throughout the Portage tree and prevent things breaking. The project is also tasked with keeping documentation up to date. The current membership is available on the wiki, but every developer should be doing their part to minimize tree breakage (and this can be as simple as always running repoman when committing!).
Right now we are having a lot of growing pains, since we were handed a vague mandate of “maintain quality in the tree” (not particularly well defined in GLEP 48), had basically no notes or direction from the remains of the previous team, and as I’m sure you’ve noticed, have had our share of missteps as we figured everything out. I am listening to the complaints, though, and we will improve. In three years, I hope to see QA as a respected and reasonably non-controversial group of developers serving as the technical counterpart to the ComRel team. It’s a long way between where we are right now and that ideal role, though.

9. I see you as very organized and able to stay calm in flame wars, how do you do it?
Contrary to appearances, I am not all that calm when I’m in the middle of a flamewar, I just don’t show it. I do my venting outside of Gentoo channels, as several of my friends can attest, since I make a point of trying to be professional and calm when dealing with Gentoo matters. I also have gotten better at knowing when an argument is going nowhere and it’s most productive to just step away from the computer.

10. What are you learning from being a team lead?
Two things. First, that there are some decisions where no matter what you choose, somebody will be upset. Second, that people’s perception of you and your team is everything when you want people to cooperate.

11. What are your favorite programs?
Firefox for web browsing, Thunderbird for mail, Pidgin for IM/IRC.

12. Age old question for Gentoo, how can we get more help?
Proxy-maint is probably the first place I’d want to expand in order to get more help. My impression is that there are a lot of users out there who want their specific package in Portage and are willing to help out to that end, and so we should be welcoming them and helping them to maintain their ebuild (and hopefully, stepping up further and becoming devs).

13. Describe your desktop setup (WM/DE)?
KDE, of course, though for a long time now I’ve only really been using the WM and the terminal app, since most of the work I do is done on the command line.

14. Tell us about you boxes and home network setup?
Since I’m at college, there isn’t much of interest here. My main computer is a three-year-old laptop which dual-boots Windows (for games) and Linux. I also have a Pandaboard ES which I occasionally fiddle around with.

15. What gives you the most enjoyment within the Gentoo community?
Closing bugs. It’s always satisfying to be able to say that you’ve figured out an issue and fixed it.

16. What gives you the most enjoyment outside the Gentoo community?
Video games. I like games that involve building things, games that involve space, and strategy/tactics games.

17. What are your plans for the future, where do you see yourself 5 years from now?
I hope that in 5 years, I will still be doing Gentoo work. I also hope to be employed. That would be nice.

Google Summer of Code 2014

GSoC 2014 is going to start soon! We are right now in the middle of the community bonding period. Students and mentors are getting to know each others before projects start for real on May 20th. This is also the perfect time for them to review documentation and polish their plan for the entire project duration.

You are welcome to follow developments in the mailing list at gentoo-soc at gentoo.org or on Freenode in the #gentoo-soc channel. There you can interact with students, mentors, and offer suggestions.

We are excited about the four projects students will work on this year. Here they are:

netifrc on systemd
Student: Rabi Shanker Guha
Mentor: Robin Johnson
Short description: The goal of this project is to abstract away the tight dependence of netifrc on OpenRC and write a compatibility layer for netifrc to work with other init systems like Systemd

Gentoo Keys: Expansion and improvements
Student: Pavlos Ratis
Mentor: Brian Dolbec
Short description: I am interested in improving and expanding the capabilities of Gentoo Keys. Gentoo Keys is a Python based project that aims to manage the GPG keys used for validation on users and Gentoo’s infra servers. Gentoo Keys will be able to verify GPG keys used for Gentoo’s release media, such as installation CD’s, Live DVD’s, packages and other GPG signed documents. It will also be used by Gentoo infrastructure to achieve GPG signed git commits in the forthcoming git migration of the main CVS tree.

Layman Improvements
Student: Devan Franchini
Mentor: Matthew Summers
Short description: This project is aimed at adding python3 support to Layman while maintaining backwards compatibility with python2.7, as well as adding new features to the codebase.

Micro Gentoo
Student: Yiyong Chen
Mentor: Sébastien Fabbro
Short description: The Micro Gentoo project goal is to create an extremely minimal Gentoo VM and fetch compiled files on-demand. These files are initially on a remote server. Meanwhile, the project also considers the smooth-secure OS updates and remote repositories selection. I would comprehensively base my work on the technologies of uCernVM, Chromeos and CoreOS, and then adapt them to Gentoo. The deliverables include Micro-Gentoo building scripts, updaters, eselect module and patches to genkernel, etc.

See you in #gentoo-soc!

Council News

(by Andreas K. Huettel)

We’ve got to catch up one council meeting, so some things have accumulated by now and I’m summarizing a bit more than usual…

First of all, “GLEP 63: Gentoo GPG key policies” is finally finalized. Yay! You can find the approved text version here [1]. Most important part, if you want to follow the best practices you need a RSA (v4) 4096bit main key with expiry time of at most 3 years. Hard requirement for the main key is either DSA 2048bit or RSA (v4) >=2048bit and maximum 5 years expiry time. Anyway, this means we can actually start thinking about some marginally more advanced topics such as, say, even maybe sometime in the future signature verification!

Then… regarding the Filesystem Hierarchy Standard. Some debate had come up whether packages (i.e. udev, eudev, systemd) storing default config files in /usr/lib violate existing policies. End result of debate and motion was that this is OK and that no additional policy is required.

On the subject of base-2 (2^10) versus base-10 (10^3), kB versus KiB. Given that the council is heavily dominated by those SI-indoctrinated “scientists”, it didn’t really come as a big surprise that at least clear and unambiguous unit prefixes should be used. So here’s the adopted motion: “Whenever practical, developers are required to use unit prefixes defined in IEC 80000-13 (kB, KiB, etc) so that output is unambiguous. This does not require maintainers to patch upstream code to change its behavior, but they should be applied with code that originates in Gentoo.”

Next, we discussed some recent commits around virtual/libudev and the sequence of events that followed them. The feeling was that no additional policy is required at the moment, but that it would be useful to state the opinion of the council regarding these events. So, we wrote it up and sent an e-mail [2], please read it and keep it close to your heart.

Finally we would like to remind Petteri to upload the council meeting summary of June 2013! :)

[1] https://wiki.gentoo.org/wiki/GLEP:63
[2] http://thread.gmane.org/gmane.linux.gentoo.project/3549

Gentoo Developer Moves

Summary

Gentoo is made up of 232 active developers, of which 32 are currently away.
Gentoo has recruited a total of 794 developers since its inception.

Changes

The following developers have recently changed roles:

  • Jonathan Callen (jcallen) has joined the multilib project
  • Jason A. Donenfeld (zx2c4) has joined the radio herd
  • The entire mobile-phone herd has been removed due to lack of maintainers and interest

 Additions

No new developers have joined the project this month.

Moves

The following developers left the project (pending retirements since 2013)

  • Stephanie J. Lockwood-Childs (wormo)
  • Paul de Vrieze (pauldv)
  • Torsten Veller (tove)
  • Constanze Hausner (constanze)
  • Dane Smith (c1pher)
  • Robert Piasek (dagger)
  • Zhang Le (r0bertz)
  • Christian Parpart (trapni)
  • Rajiv Aaron Manglani (rajiv)
  • Mu Qiao (qiaomuf)
  • Lukasz Damentko (rane)
  • Olivier Crête (tester)
  • Tim Sammut (underling)
  • Serkan Kaba (serkan)
  • Benedikt Boehm (hollow)
  • Ron Gemeinhardt (timebandit)
  • Andrew Gaffney (agaffney)
  • Chris PeBenito (pebenito)
  • Michele Noberasco (s4t4n)

Help Wanted

The Ruby and Java projects are looking for help to keep jruby dev-java/jruby up to date and included in the portage tree. See this blog post and bug 442230 for more information. Moreover, proxy-maintainers are looking for new developers as well.

Portage

This section summarizes the current state of the portage tree.

Architectures 45
Categories 161
Packages 17380
Ebuilds 37123
Architecture Stable Testing Total % of Packages
alpha 3592 538 4130 23.76%
amd64 10707 6172 16879 97.12%
amd64-fbsd 0 1578 1578 9.08%
arm 2627 1656 4283 24.64%
arm64 436 29 465 2.68%
hppa 3041 489 3530 20.31%
ia64 3176 596 3772 21.70%
m68k 574 93 667 3.84%
mips 4 2375 2379 13.69%
ppc 6813 2397 9210 52.99%
ppc64 4310 878 5188 29.85%
s390 1476 312 1788 10.29%
sh 1673 384 2057 11.84%
sparc 4118 903 5021 28.89%
sparc-fbsd 0 319 319 1.84%
x86 11423 5196 16619 95.62%
x86-fbsd 0 3235 3235 18.61%

gmn-portage-stats-2014-04

Security

The following GLSAs have been released by the Security Team

GLSA Package Description Bug
201404-07 dev-libs/openssl OpenSSL: Information Disclosure 505278
201404-06 media-libs/mesa Mesa: Multiple vulnerabilities 432400
201404-05 net-fs/openafs OpenAFS: Multiple vulnerabilities 265538
201404-04 dev-ruby/crack Crack: Arbitrary code execution 460164
201404-03 media-gfx/optipng OptiPNG: User-assisted execution of arbitrary code 435340
201404-02 net-libs/libproxy libproxy: User-assisted execution of arbitrary code 438146
201404-01 net-print/cups CUPS: Arbitrary file read/write 442926

Package Removals/Additions

Removals

Package Developer Date
app-i18n/prime naota 02 Apr 2014
app-i18n/gtkimprime naota 02 Apr 2014
app-i18n/scim-prime naota 02 Apr 2014
app-emacs/prime-el naota 02 Apr 2014
dev-libs/suikyo naota 02 Apr 2014
app-emacs/mell ulm 02 Apr 2014
dev-ruby/locale_rails mrueg 05 Apr 2014
dev-ruby/parsetree mrueg 05 Apr 2014
dev-ruby/rubymail mrueg 05 Apr 2014
net-proxy/swiftiply mrueg 05 Apr 2014
www-servers/mongrel mrueg 05 Apr 2014
app-pda/libopensync-plugin-evolution2 ssuominen 06 Apr 2014
x11-themes/gdm-themes-livecd ulm 12 Apr 2014
net-ftp/pftpfxp ulm 14 Apr 2014
kde-misc/youtube-servicemenu johu 15 Apr 2014
sys-infiniband/libsdp alexxy 16 Apr 2014
dev-ruby/oniguruma mrueg 18 Apr 2014
dev-ruby/sary-ruby mrueg 18 Apr 2014
dev-ruby/rand mrueg 18 Apr 2014
dev-ruby/system_timer mrueg 18 Apr 2014
dev-ruby/fastercsv mrueg 18 Apr 2014
dev-ruby/ruby-taglib mrueg 19 Apr 2014
dev-ruby/rubytorrent mrueg 19 Apr 2014
dev-ruby/revolution mrueg 19 Apr 2014
app-misc/alexandria mrueg 19 Apr 2014
app-misc/bins zlogene 19 Apr 2014
dev-python/certifi floppym 20 Apr 2014
dev-python/mozfile floppym 20 Apr 2014
dev-python/mozinfo floppym 20 Apr 2014
dev-python/mozprocess floppym 20 Apr 2014
dev-python/mozprofile floppym 20 Apr 2014
dev-python/mozrunner floppym 20 Apr 2014
x11-themes/faenza-xfce-icon-theme ssuominen 23 Apr 2014
media-plugins/vdr-eggtimer hd_brummy 26 Apr 2014
media-plugins/vdr-ac3mode hd_brummy 26 Apr 2014
media-plugins/vdr-bitstreamout hd_brummy 26 Apr 2014
gnome-extra/evolution-groupwise pacho 26 Apr 2014
net-analyzer/ethstatus jer 27 Apr 2014

Additions

Package Developer Date
sys-apps/toybox patrick 01 Apr 2014
kde-base/zeroconf-ioslave johu 01 Apr 2014
dev-python/kivy-garden slis 02 Apr 2014
dev-python/Kivy slis 02 Apr 2014
dev-ruby/combustion mrueg 02 Apr 2014
dev-libs/double-conversion bicatali 02 Apr 2014
sci-libs/openlibm bicatali 02 Apr 2014
dev-python/cryptography-vectors radhermit 03 Apr 2014
media-libs/gstreamer-editing-services eva 06 Apr 2014
app-admin/clog tomwij 07 Apr 2014
dev-ruby/pygments_rb mrueg 07 Apr 2014
app-i18n/libcangjie naota 08 Apr 2014
sys-apps/netloc alexxy 08 Apr 2014
mate-base/caja tomwij 10 Apr 2014
dev-ruby/rkelly-remix zerochaos 11 Apr 2014
app-emulation/rex-client mduft 11 Apr 2014
xfce-extra/multiload-nandhp ssuominen 11 Apr 2014
app-backup/duply hwoarang 13 Apr 2014
dev-python/sparqlwrapper idella4 14 Apr 2014
media-video/movit patrick 15 Apr 2014
dev-python/cangjie naota 16 Apr 2014
sys-infiniband/libmlx5 alexxy 16 Apr 2014
sys-infiniband/qperf alexxy 16 Apr 2014
sys-infiniband/libocrdma alexxy 16 Apr 2014
dev-python/pyringe dastergon 16 Apr 2014
kde-base/baloo-widgets johu 16 Apr 2014
kde-base/kfilemetadata johu 16 Apr 2014
kde-base/baloo johu 16 Apr 2014
dev-python/pyroma dastergon 16 Apr 2014
dev-libs/libntru hasufell 16 Apr 2014
sys-libs/ntdb polynomial-c 17 Apr 2014
www-apps/jekyll mrueg 18 Apr 2014
dev-ruby/awesome_nested_set mrueg 18 Apr 2014
sec-policy/selinux-accountsd swift 18 Apr 2014
net-analyzer/nagios-check_openvpn-simple mjo 20 Apr 2014
dev-python/oslo-rootwrap prometheanfire 20 Apr 2014
dev-python/oslo-messaging prometheanfire 21 Apr 2014
dev-python/pycadf prometheanfire 21 Apr 2014
dev-ruby/fivemat zerochaos 21 Apr 2014
dev-python/python-saharaclient prometheanfire 22 Apr 2014
dev-ruby/charlock_holmes mrueg 22 Apr 2014
dev-ruby/forgery mrueg 22 Apr 2014
kde-base/kqtquickcharts kensington 22 Apr 2014
kde-base/artikulate kensington 22 Apr 2014
app-admin/eselect-lua mabi 22 Apr 2014
dev-python/pycollada xmw 23 Apr 2014
app-i18n/ibus-cangjie naota 24 Apr 2014
www-misc/zoneminder dilfridge 25 Apr 2014
net-libs/libosmo-abis zx2c4 26 Apr 2014
net-wireless/openbsc zx2c4 26 Apr 2014
net-wireless/osmobts zx2c4 26 Apr 2014
dev-ruby/actionview graaff 26 Apr 2014
dev-libs/uchardet maksbotan 26 Apr 2014
net-dns/dnscap wschlich 26 Apr 2014
net-libs/liba53 zx2c4 26 Apr 2014
net-firewall/fwknop tomwij 27 Apr 2014
net-misc/lcr zx2c4 27 Apr 2014
app-arch/engrampa tomwij 27 Apr 2014
app-editors/pluma tomwij 27 Apr 2014
app-text/atril tomwij 27 Apr 2014
media-libs/libmediaart eva 27 Apr 2014
net-libs/libgfbgraph eva 27 Apr 2014

Bugzilla

The Gentoo community uses Bugzilla to record and track bugs, notifications, suggestions and other interactions with the development team.

Activity

The following tables and charts summarize the activity on Bugzilla between 29 March 2014 and 28 April 2014. Not fixed means bugs that were resolved as NEEDINFO, WONTFIX, CANTFIX, INVALID or UPSTREAM.
gmn-activity-2014-04

Bug Activity Number
New 1452
Closed 891
Not fixed 148
Duplicates 164
Total 5677
Blocker 4
Critical 17
Major 68

Closed bug ranking

The following table outlines the teams and developers with the most bugs resolved during this period.

Rank Team/Developer Bug Count
1 Gentoo Games 44
2 Gentoo KDE team 37
3 Python Gentoo Team 35
4 Gentoo Linux Gnome Desktop Team 34
5 Gentoo Security 30
6 Nikoli 23
7 Java team 19
8 media-video herd 18
9 Gentoo Linux MySQL bugs team 17
10 Others 633

gmn-closed-2014-04

Assigned bug ranking

The developers and teams who have been assigned the most bugs during this period are as follows.

Rank Team/Developer Bug Count
1 Gentoo Linux bug wranglers 90
2 Gentoo Security 85
3 Gentoo KDE team 55
4 Gentoo Linux Gnome Desktop Team 55
5 Nikoli 52
6 Python Gentoo Team 48
7 Gentoo's Team for Core System packages 44
8 Portage team 34
9 Gentoo Games 28
10 Others 960

gmn-opened-2014-04

Tip of the month

Portage File List

What is Portage File List?
Portage File List collects which files are installed by which ebuild on users machines. It shares this data publicly for searching/browsing.

PFL needs Portage data from your system. The more ebuilds you have installed the better. The more exotic ebuilds you have installed the better. Every Gentoo user can help!

emerge app-portage/pfl

This will install a cron job that submits new data to the PFL servers every week. Don’t worry, your privacy remains protected as we are not collecting anything else than portage data, and we don’t store who sends what.

As a bonus you get /usr/bin/e-file a command line utility to search for files installed by ebuilds. It allows a user to search for files that are not installed on their system and figure out which ebuild they need to install in order to obtain it. E-file requires internet access to obtain its information from the PFL website and database. Pfl is quicker than equery to search for files (even if not installed locally), while equery is more powerful and gives more options to search. Equery is limited to currently installed packages only.

The equery program is installed with the app-portage/gentoolkit package, a collection of administration scripts for Gentoo.

Heard in the community

Send us your favorite Gentoo script or tip at gmn@gentoo.org

Getting Involved?

Interested in helping out? The GMN relies on volunteers and members of the community for content every month. If you are interested in writing for the GMN or thinking of another way to contribute, please send an e-mail to gmn@gentoo.org.

April 28, 2014
Alex Legler a.k.a. a3li (homepage, bugs)
Gentoo LaTeX Beamer Theme (April 28, 2014, 11:44 UTC)

Due to frequent requests, here’s the LaTeX Beamer theme I made for the 2012 Gentoo Miniconf in Prague:

Gentoo beamer theme

It’s available via git:
https://git.a3li.li/r/gentoo/beamer-gentoo.git
or to browse online:
https://git.a3li.li/summary/gentoo!beamer-gentoo.git

The contrib/ directory contains a fixed outer template for LaTeX Beamer that increases the top and bottom margins. That hack was needed as the projector back in Prague cropped the image in a weird way. May come in handy for other venues as well. ;)

April 23, 2014
Hans de Graaff a.k.a. graaff (homepage, bugs)
The precarious state of jruby in Gentoo (April 23, 2014, 17:13 UTC)

tl;dr jruby in Gentoo will have to go unless we get volunteers to help us with the jruby 1.7 series.

jruby has been available in Gentoo since 2004 and is currently at version 1.6.8. People following jruby will realize that this is a problem: the latest upstream version is 1.7.12 as of this writing. The 1.6 series is also based on ruby 1.8.7 by default. This is a problem since we have removed ruby 1.8 from the tree altogether, and support for it in ruby packages is disappearing fast. jruby 1.6 has a 1.9 mode, but that is based on ruby 1.9.2 where most packages expect at least 1.9.3. We are currently experimenting with defaulting to 1.9.2 mode to extend the 1.6 series. In short, more and more packages that currently have jruby target will loose it on updates since it simply is no longer compatible with jruby 1.7 and in its current state jruby in Gentoo is ready for a slow and agonizing descent. Or we could just be quick about it and mask it soon.

Why not just update to jruby 1.7, you might wonder? We have bug 442230 to track this update, but unfortunately it turns out that it is not easy to add the 1.7 series of jruby to Gentoo. The biggest stumbling block here is that the 1.7 build system is based on Maven. Using Maven is not well supported in Gentoo, mostly because Maven requires the ability to download code during its build phase and does not play very nice with Gentoo's package structure in general. It may be possible to fix this, but that requires good knowledge of Java and Ruby on Gentoo. Currently we don't have any developers capable of both, and passing the code back and forth isn't very practical and proves to go very slow in practice.

So we are looking for a volunteer who wants to pick up this project, and help us bring the jruby 1.7 series to Gentoo. If you see this as a step to become a Gentoo developer than that's great and we can mentor you. If you see this as an interesting one-off project to help out with, that's great too. Once 1.7 is in the tree it should not be a big deal to keep up with new versions. Feel free to drop by in #gentoo-ruby to discuss this with us if you are interested. Our ruby overlay holds the current work-in-progress on jruby 1.7.

If no-one volunteers, unless a magical break-through suddenly appears, we will most likely be forced to mask jruby and remove it from the tree. Help us to not do that!

April 20, 2014
Sven Vermeulen a.k.a. swift (homepage, bugs)

Today I had to verify a patch that I pushed upstream but which was slightly modified. As I don’t use the tool myself (it was a user-reported issue) I decided to quickly drum up a live ebuild for the application and install it (as the patch was in the upstream repository but not in a release yet). The patch is for fcron‘s SELinux support, so the file I created is fcron-9999.ebuild.

Sadly, the build failed at the documentation generation (something about “No targets to create en/HTML/index.html”). That’s unfortunate, because that means I’m not going to ask to push the live ebuild to the Portage tree itself (yet). But as my primary focus is to validate the patch (and not create a live ebuild) I want to ignore this error and go on. I don’t need the fcron documentation right now, so how about I just continue?

To do so, I start using the ebuild command. As the failure occurred in the build phase (compile) and at the end (documentation was the last step), I tell Portage that it should assume the build has completed:

~# touch /var/portage/portage/sys-process/fcron-9999/.compiled

Then I tell Portage to install the (built) files into the images/ directory:

~# ebuild /home/swift/dev/gentoo.overlay/sys-process/fcron/fcron-9999.ebuild install

The installation phase fails again (with the same error as during the build, which is logical as the Makefile can’t install files that haven’t been properly build yet.) As documentation is the last step, I tell Portage to assume the installation phase has completed as well, continuing with the merging of the files to the life file system:

~# touch /var/portage/portage/sys-process/fcron-9999/.installed
~# ebuild /home/swift/dev/gentoo.overlay/sys-process/fcron/fcron-9999.ebuild qmerge

Et voila, fcron-9999 is now installed on the system, ready to validate the patch I had to check.